Biology

Terry Trier

Terry Trier, Ph.D.
Associate Professor

Zoology; Physiology; Ecology

Office: 232 Padnos
Phone: (616) 331-2476
Email: triert@gvsu.edu

Dr. Trier's Homepage

 
Education:

Ph.D. - 1994 - Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, Zoology.
Dissertation: "Ecological Implications of Diet-Induced Thermogenesis in the Prairie Vole, Microtus ochrogaster."

B.S. - 1987 - Purdue University, Fort Wayne, Indiana, Biology.

 

Courses taught at GVSU:

BIO 432 Comparative Physiology
BIO 121 Organismal Biology
BIO 103 Human Biology
BIO 232 Invertebrate Zoology


Research Interests:

Dr. Trier is a comparative physiologist who specializes in the field of nutritional ecology. Dr. Trier has worked on both mammalian and insect physiology and nutritional ecology. At the physiological level, Dr. Trier is interested in how the balance of dietary nutrients can influence the metabolic rate and energy balance of wild herbivores that normally consume diets that are low in nitrogen or other nutrients and therefore "unbalanced." Additionally, he is interested in exploring the underlying physiological mechanisms that facilitate low energy efficiencies that occur when animals consume unbalanced diets.

At the ecological level, Dr. Trier is studying plant-herbivore interactions and plant defense in terms of how plants respond to herbivory by increasing their fiber content and thereby dilute their nitrogen and energy concentrations, making them less desirable as a food source. Additionally, Dr. Trier is studying the effects of anthropogenic pollutants (CO2 and O3) on plants, and the concomitant effects such plants have on the herbivores that consume them.

Dr. Trier is interested in students willing to work in Rhinelander, Wisconsin during the summer, where his greenhouse gas research is based. Dr. Trier is also looking for students that would like to work on insect energetics. This would entail feeding insects leaves and then measuring their performance in terms of growth and efficiency of energy retention. Students working on this project learn bomb calorimetry, digital image analysis, some basic insect ecology, and how to calculate insect nutritional indices and basic statistics.

Dr. Trier is available to mentor students with independent projects in animal physiology. Although physiological projects with an ecological emphasis are preferred, Dr. Trier is willing to work with students on a wide variety of projects in the field of general and comparative animal physiology, nutritional ecology, and general ecology.

Recent Publications:

 

Herms, D.A., W.J. Mattson, D.N. Karowe, M.D. Coleman, T.M. Trier, B.A. Birr, and J.G. Isebrands (1996). Variable performance of outbreak defoliators on aspen clones exposed to elevated CO2 and O3. Proceedings of the 1995 Northern Global Change Program, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, March 14-16. USDA Gen. Tech. Rept. NE-214, 43-55.

Nitao, J.K., M.G. Nair, W.J. Mattson, D.A. Herms, B.A. Birr, T.M. Trier, and J.G. Isebrands (1996). Effects of elevated CO2 and ozone on phenolic glycosides of trembling aspen. USDA Gen. Tech. Rept. NE-214. Proceedings of the 1995 Northern Global Change Program, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, March 14-16. USDA Gen. Tech. Rept. NE-214, 42. (abstract).

Trier, T.M. 1996. Diet-induced thermogenesis in the prairie vole, Microtus ochrogaster. Physiological Zoology 69(6):1456-1468.

Trier, T.M. and W.J. Mattson. 1997. Needle mining by the spruce budworm provides sustenance in the midst of privation. Oikos 79:241-246.

Trier, T.M. and W.J. Mattson 1997. Waldbauer revisited: new directions for nutritional indices. Newslett. Mich. Ent. Soc. 42(2-4).

Shontz, N. N., Shontz, J. P., Leeling, N. C., Huizenga, P.A., Matthews, P. A., Hunt, J. Trier, T. M. 1998-2001 editions. Laboratory Experiments and Exercises, Biology 111, General Biology 1. T. M. Trier, Ed., Dept. of Biology, Grand Valley State University, Wiley Custom Services.

Recent Posters and Presentations:

Combs, J. 2000. Student Scholarship Day. Feeding efficiency of gypsy moth and forest tent caterpillar on leaf samples derived from birch exposed to increased CO2 levels in a free-air environment.

Devlin, T. 2000. Student Scholarship Day. Internal parasite survey of rehabilitation raptors and Passeriformes.

Trier, T.M. and W.J. Mattson 2000. Waldbauer nutritional indices: the trouble with grams. Presentation, Northern Association of Physiological Ecologists Annual Meeting, September 22-24, 2000.

Degenhardt, D. 1999. Student Scholarship Day. Performance of gypsy moth on birch exposed to elevated CO2 under free-air conditions.

Degenhardt, D.C., Trier, T.M. and Mattson, W.J. 1999. Performance of Gypsy Moth on Birch Exposed to Elevated CO2 Under Free-Air Conditions. Presentation, Michigan Academy of Sciences annual meeting.

Trier, T.M. and Mattson, W.J. 1999. The interaction between birch exposed to elevated CO2 under free-air conditions and the performance of the gypsy moth. Presentation, Northern Association of Physiological Ecologists Annual Meeting, October 1-3, 1999.

Trier, T.M. and W.J. Mattson 1997. Waldbauer revisited: new directions for nutritional indices. Abstract/presentation, MES annual meeting.

Trier, T.M. and W.J. Mattson 1996. `Power' vs. efficiency: energy flow to the metabolic pool. University of Turku, Department of Ecological Zoology, Turku, Finland. Invited lecture.


Scientific & Professional Societies:

National Association of Biology Teachers, 1999-2000
Michigan Entomological Society, 1994-2000
The Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology, Division of Comparative Physiology & Biochemistry, 1987-2000
Northern Association of Physiological Ecologists, 1997-2000
Sigma Xi, 1997-2000
Michigan Academy of Science, 1997-2000

 

Page last modified March 13, 2014