Undergraduate Courses

BMS 100 Human Health and Disease. Presents the basic terminology and concepts of
medicine and health maintenance for non-science students. Emphasis is on the interaction of technical concepts of health and disease with the political, economic, legal, and ethical aspects of American society. Fulfills Foundation - Life Sciences. Offered fall, winter and occasionally summer semesters. Three credits.

BMS 102 Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Sciences.
An introduction to principles and practices of cytotechnology, histotechnology, and medical technology and the role of professionals in these fields as members of the health care team. Restricted to freshmen, sophomores, or transfer students, or by permit. Offered winter semester. One credit.

BMS 105 Basic Nutrition.
An investigation of the bases of nutrition, from a scientific and social-psychological viewpoint. Problems of malnutrition, food as a social phenomenon, and current controversies in nutrition will be discussed. Offered fall, winter, and occasionally summer semesters. Three credits.

BMS 180 Special Topics in the Biomedical Sciences.
Special topics not regularly offered, but of interest to students in the biomedical sciences. Courses will be listed in the class schedule.  Offered fall and winter semesters. One to four credits.

BMS 202 Anatomy and Physiology.
An introduction to the human body, its form and function.  With the study of each system, correlations between its function and the functions of other systems are emphasized. Lecture and laboratory. Fulfills Foundation - Life Sciences with a Lab. (3-0-2)  Offered fall and winter semesters. Four credits.

BMS 208 Human Anatomy.
A lecture course on the gross anatomy of human tissues and organ systems, including pertinent embryology. (3-0-0) Offered fall, winter, and summer semesters. Prerequisite: BIO 120 or BMS 202. Three credits.

BMS 212 Introductory Microbiology.
An introduction to the fundamental principles and techniques of bacteriology, immunology, and virology. Emphasis on the morphology, genetics, and physiology of micro-organisms producing human disease and the human response to these agents. (3-0-0) Offered fall, winter, and summer semesters. Prerequisite: BIO 120 and (CHM 230 or CHM 232 or CHM 241). Three credits.

BMS 213 Laboratory in Microbiology.
Laboratory investigation into the morphology, isolation techniques, growth, and identification of bacteria. (0-0-4) Offered fall, winter, and summer semesters. Prerequisite: BMS 212 or concurrent enrollment. One credit.

BMS 222  Introduction to Public Health.
Introduction to the history, philosophy, current concepts, practice, and administration of public health in the United States. Offered fall semester. Three credits.

BMS 223 Public Health Concepts.
An introduction to the strategies and tactics, both past and present, for the control and eradication of infectious and chronic diseases of humans. Offered winter semester. Three credits.  Fulfills one of the Issues/Themes requirements.


BMS 250 – Anatomy & Physiology I.  The first semester of a two-semester anatomy and physiology sequence. Focus is on the basic principles of homeostasis, cells, and tissues. The structure and function of the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems will also be covered. Not applicable to BMS major.  Four credits.  Offered every semester.

 

BMS 251 – Anatomy & Physiology II.  This is the second of a two-semester anatomy and physiology sequence. The structure and function of the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems as well as fluid and electrolyte balance, acid base balance, and basic metabolism will be covered. Not applicable to BMS major.  Four credits.  Offered every semester. Prerequisite: BMS 250.

BMS 280 Special Topics in the Biomedical Sciences . Special topics not regularly offered, but of interest to students in the biomedical sciences. Courses will be listed in the class schedule. Offered fall and winter semesters. One to four credits.


BMS 290 Human Physiology. An integrated study of physiological systems with major
consideration given to the mechanisms involved in maintaining homeostasis. Normal function is emphasized, but clinical correlations are included where appropriate. Ordinarily, students enrolled in BMS 290 should be enrolled simultaneously in BMS 291. (3-0-0) Offered fall, winter, and summer semesters. Prerequisites: BMS 208 and two semesters of chemistry. A physics course is recommended. Three credits.

BMS 291 Laboratory in Human Physiology.
Laboratory in Human Physiology is designed to practically demonstrate the principles that govern functions of the human body. This laboratory will emphasize and introduce students to normal physiological values and, therefore, set the framework for future courses of students pursuing a career in health related fields. (0-0-3) Offered fall, winter, and summer semesters. Prerequisite or corequisite: BMS 290 or concurrent registration. One credit.

BMS 301 Introduction to Research in the Biomedical Sciences.
Introduces students majoring in any of the science programs to basic steps in carrying out research, literature searching, critical reading of the literature, experimental design, data analysis, and scientific writing.  Published papers and experiments will be analyzed. Students will write a variety of papers and reports. Offered fall and winter semesters. Prerequisites: STA 215 and sophomore standing.  Three credits.

BMS 305 Clinical Nutrition.
This course has two objectives: to enable students to understand normal digestion, absorption, and metabolism of nutrients at a sophisticated level, and to make them aware of the nutritional needs of diseased patients. Pathophysiology of the gastrointestinal system will be considered. Offered fall and winter semesters. Prerequisite: BMS 290. Three credits.

BMS 306 Advanced Human Nutrition.
An in-depth examination of the biochemical and physiological functions of nutrients and their relationships to health and disease. The digestion, absorption, and transport of nutrients are discussed. The integrated regulation of metabolism at the physiological, cellular, and molecular levels in response to altered nutritional and hormonal status is emphasized. Offered fall and summer semester. Prerequisites: BMS 290 or 291 or MOV 304, and CHM 232 or CHM 461. Three credits.

BMS 307 Advanced Clinical Nutrition.
This course will focus and emphasize the role of nutrition in prevention and therapy. Students will be able to understand the physiological and metabolic abnormalities in acute and chronic diseases at a sophisticated level. Offered winter semester. Prerequisite: BMS 306. Three credits.

BMS 309 Laboratory in Human Anatomy.
A laboratory course covering the gross anatomy of the skeletal, muscular, nervous, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, reproductive, urinary, and endocrine systems through the use of human cadavers. (0-0-3) Offered every semester. Prerequisites: B– or better in BMS 208. One credit.

BMS 310 Basic Pathophysiology.
Presentation of disease processes in terms of physiologic dysfunction. Pathophysiology emphasizes the disruption of normal steady state relationships and considers the minor, acute, and chronic aspects of disease. This provides a link between the basic medical sciences and their clinical application. Offered fall, winter, and occasionally summer semesters. Prerequisite: BMS 251 or BMS 290. Three credits.

BMS 311 Pharmacological Aspects of Biomedical Sciences.
A lecture course designed to introduce nursing and biomedical sciences students to the principles of pharmacology and pharmacological aspects of the major classes of drugs used in the treatment of disease. Special emphasis on nursing implications associated with the clinical use of the pharmacological agents discussed. Offered fall, winter, and summer semesters. Prerequisite: BMS 310 or equivalent or instructor’s permission. Three credits.

BMS 312 Bacterial Genetics.
An advanced genetics course using micro-organisms to analyze fundamental biological processes: mutation, replication, recombination, and transposition, along with the expression of genes and the processing of their products. (3-0-0) Offered fall semester of even-numbered years. Prerequisites: BMS 212 or BIO 357, and BIO 355 or BIO375. Three credits.

BMS 313 Bacterial Genetics Laboratory.
A selected set of experiments to demonstrate important principles of bacterial genetics, including basic microbial methodology, mutagensis, and gene transfer. (0-0-4) Offered fall semester of even numbered years. Prerequisite: BMS 312 or concurrent registration. One credit.

BMS 322 Bacterial Physiology.
An advanced microbiology course covering basic principles of prokaryotic physiology. Micro-organisms will serve as a model system for understanding how an organism accomplishes life functions: bacterial growth, nutrition, response, and metabolic processes. Includes how microbial physiology is studied and applications to human physiology, disease, antibiotic production and resistance, and biotechnology. (3-0-0) Offered fall semester of odd numbered years. Prerequisites: BMS 212 or BIO 357, or permission of instructor. Three credits.

BMS 323 Bacterial Physiology Laboratory.
Investigation of the physiology of bacteria.
Analysis of bacterial growth, nutrition, responses to the environment, and metabolic processes. Techniques for analysis of bacterial physiology. (0-0-4) Offered fall semester of odd-numbered years. Prerequisite: BMS 322 or concurrent registration. One credit.

BMS 355 Anatomy of Joints.
Lecture and laboratory prosection study of the anatomy of
synovial joints found in the human limbs, vertebral column, and skull. Emphasis on normal musculoskeletal anatomy. (1-0-2) Offered winter semester. Prerequisite: BMS 208 and BMS 309 or equivalent human anatomy course. Two credits.

BMS 374 Physiological Aspects of Death and Dying.
An overview of the physiological processes connected with death and dying. Topics include body mechanisms associated with aging and common causes of death, autopsies, decomposition, modes of body disposition (and how they differ among cultures), and methods of body preservation (e.g., embalming and mummification). Fulfills one of the Issues/Themes requirements.  Not counted as an elective for BMS and BIOS majors. Offered fall semester (and summer semester upon demand). Three credits.

BMS 375 The Biology of Aging.
An introductory course in the anatomical and physiological aspects of the normal aging process, designed for students from a broad range of disciplines. Emphasis will be placed on the normal aging process as it occurs in the majority of the population. Offered fall semester. Prerequisites: BMS 208 and BMS 290. Three credits.

BMS 380 Special Topics in the Biomedical Sciences.
Special topics not regularly offered, but of interest to students in the biomedical sciences. Courses will be listed in the class schedule. Offered fall and winter semesters. One to six credits.

BMS 399 Readings in the Biomedical Sciences.
Independent, supervised readings on selected topics prearranged with a faculty sponsor and approved by the program chair. May be elected for one to three hours credit toward a major in any biomedical sciences program, or with permission for group science or biology majors. Offered fall and winter semesters. Prerequisite: Written permission of instructor prior to registration. One to three credits.

BMS 404 Community Nutrition.
This course will cover the field of community nutrition characteristics, purpose, and job opportunities. It will also discuss the following: the methods used to assess a group or community’s nutritional status; the tools to evaluate community intervention programs; the cultural diversity found in the community; and the implications of such diversity for health professionals. Offered Winter Semester. Prerequisite: BMS 105 and Junior standing. Three credits.

BMS 407 Nutrition in the Life Cycle.
The course will cover nutritional aspects associated with each phase of the human cycle including pre-pregnancy, pregnancy, infancy, childhood, adolescence and late adulthood. Major pathological conditions that can occur throughout the life cycle will be discussed. Offered winter semester. Prerequisite: BMS 305 or BMS 306. Three credits.

BMS 408 Advanced Human Physiology.
Emphasis on cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the functioning of the body systems, with emphasis on neuromuscular, cardiovascular, renal, and endocrine systems. Study includes the current research, literature, and current experimental knowledge. Prerequisites: BMS 290 or permission of instructor. Three credits.

BMS 410 Immunology.
An introduction to the immune response, including the properties of antigens, immunoglobulins, the theories of antibody formation, cell-mediated immunity, and hypersensitivity reactions. Offered fall semester. Prerequisites: BMS 212 and CHM 232 or CHM 242 or permission of instructor. Three credits.

BMS 411 Immunology Laboratory.
An introduction to serological reactions, including: serum electrophoretic techniques, single and double diffusion in gels, hemagglutination reactions and complement fixation. (0-0-3) Offered winter semester. Prerequisites: BMS 410 or BMS 499 or CHM 462. One credit.

BMS 412 Medical Bacteriology.
A study of the host-parasite relationships in bacterial disease. The theoretical basis of isolation and identification of medically important bacteria including anaerobic and newly identified pathogens will be included. Offered winter semester. Prerequisite: BMS 212. Three credits.

BMS 413 Medical Bacteriology Laboratory.
Isolation and identification of the more common bacterial pathogens with emphasis on current clinical methods and normal flora. (0-0-4) Offered winter semester. Prerequisites: BMS 412 or concurrent registration. Two credits.

BMS 415 Nutrition and Physical Performance.
After a brief introduction to the basic concepts of exercise physiology this course will explore how physical activity may alter nutrient needs, and the mechanisms by which nutrition influences physical performance. Emphasis will also be placed on the practical implementation of dietary strategies to optimize exercise performance. Offered Winter and Summer semesters. Prerequisites: BMS 305 or BMS 306. Three credits.

BMS 416 Hematology.
A study of normal and abnormal blood cell development, morphology, and function. Blood dyscrasias will be studied with emphasis on the biochemical and morphological changes involved in disease. Offered fall semester. Prerequisites: BMS 208 and CHM 232 or permission of instructor. Two credits.

BMS 417 Clinical Hematology Laboratory.
An introduction to a wide variety of clinical laboratory procedures with emphasis on accurate performance, theoretical basis of the tests and correlation of the data to disease. (0-0-3) Offered fall semester. Prerequisite: BMS 416 or concurrent registration. One credit.

BMS 427 Neuroanatomy.
Covers the organization of the human nervous system with emphasis on the pathways and nuclei of the central nervous system. Offered fall semester. Prerequisite: BMS 309. One credit.

BMS 428 Neurosciences.
Covers the function of the human nervous system. Emphasis on somatosensory and somatomotor systems and the cranial nerve nuclei involved in disease. Offered spring/summer session; winter on demand. Prerequisite: BMS 427. Three credits.

BMS 431 Medical Virology.
A study of the physical, morphological, and biochemical characteristics of viruses. Emphasis on the pathogenesis, pathology, and control mechanisms of viral diseases in humans. Offered winter semester. Prerequisite: CHM 241. Three credits.

BMS 432 Medical Mycology.
A study of the human mycoses with emphasis on the pathogenesis and epidemiology of fungal infections. Techniques for isolation and identification of fungi. (2-0-0) Offered fall semester. Prerequisites: BMS 212 and CHM 241. Two credits.

BMS 433 Medical Parasitology.
A study of host parasite relationships in humans. Significant human parasites and the pathogenesis and epidemiology of parasite infection. (2-0-2) Offered fall semester. Prerequisites: BMS 212 and CHM 241. Three credits.

BMS 450 Human Histology.
A lecture/laboratory course in normal human light microscopic anatomy. Students will learn the microanatomy of the primary tissue types, organs and organ systems. Includes discussion of relevant pathological conditions. (2-0-4) Offered fall semester. Prerequisite: BMS 208. Four credits.

BMS 460 Regional Human Anatomy.
A regional approach to the structure of the human body, concentrating on the interrelationships of different anatomical structures in the limbs, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and head and neck. (2-0-4) Offered winter semester. Prerequisites: BMS 309 and permission of instructor. Four credits.

BMS 461 Prosected Regional Anatomy.
A regional approach to the gross anatomy of the human body through the use of prosected cadavers. (3-0-3) Offered fall semester. Prerequisite: Admission to the Physical Therapy or Physician’s Assistant Studies program. Four credits.

BMS 466 Dynamic Human Performance Lab.
Laboratory investigation of human performance capacities using modern techniques of measurement for dynamic assessment of anthropometric, biomechanical, physiological, pulmonary, cardiovascular, and metabolic parameters. Offered winter semester. Prerequisites: STA 215, MOV 402, MOV 404, or MOV 304. Two credits.

BMS 475 The Pathology of Aging.
A survey of the disease and functional disabilities of aging. Emphasis is placed on prevention and rehabilitation. Offered winter semester. Three credits.

BMS 480 Special Topics in the Biomedical Sciences.
Special topics not regularly offered, but of interest to students in the biomedical sciences. Courses will be listed in the class schedule. Offered fall and winter semesters. One to four credits.

BMS 485 Preprofessional Seminar.
A review of the professional school application process, including entrance examinations, application procedures, financial aid, and experiences of past students currently enrolled in professional programs. Offered winter semester. One credit.

BMS 492 Biomedical Sciences Internship.
The Internship is a work experience at a faculty supervisor-approved location appropriate for the student’s chosen field of interest. Internships will be experiences of a minimum 10 hours/week/credit. Only 3 credit hours of BMS 492 may count toward the major. Offered every semester. Prerequisites & Notes: BMS 290, BMS 291; CHM 232 or CHM 461. Credits: 1–4.

BMS 495 Concepts in Wellness (capstone).
This biomedical sciences course will synthesize the materials students have learned from the biomedical sciences core and cognate courses and enable them to write and present professionally styled communications to an audience of their peers and instructors. (3-0-0) Offered fall, winter and occasionally summer semesters. Prerequisites: BMS 208, BMS 212, BMS 290 or BMS 291, and senior standing Offered for SWS credit. Three credits.

BMS 499 Research in the Biomedical Sciences.
Independent, supervised research in special areas of the biomedical sciences prearranged with a faculty sponsor and approved by the program chair. May be elected for up to three hours credit toward a major in any biomedical sciences program or, with permission, for group science or biology majors. Offered fall and winter semesters. One to three credits.

Page last modified February 24, 2014