Recent Accounting Publications

 

More Than a Numbers Game

The Journal of Corporate Accounting & Finance, Vol 18, No 2, Jan/Feb, 2007, pp 83-85 (Book Review)
David M. Cannon, Joseph H. Godwin, and Stephen R. Goldberg
2006
 
The authors have written a thorough and practical guide on best practices in corporate governance for public and private companies, as well as for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. Good corporate governance is important to the success of any organization and is particularly important to satisfy investors, lenders, and contributors of not-for-profit organizations and to resolve disputes in family-owned businesses. Good corporate governance helps an organization to make good decisions, prevent fraud and scandal, and avoid civil and criminal liability. Best practices are defined as those whose benefits exceed their costs. The authors are nationally recognized experts on corporate governance. They draw on their wealth of experience to include case profiles of corporate governance examples in each chapter.
 
 
Lean Manufacturing and Selling a Business
The Journal of Corporate Accounting & Finance, Vol 17, No 4, pp 79-81, May/June, 2006 (Book Review)
Stephen R. Goldberg, Joseph H. Godwin, and David Cannon
2006
 
This book brings lean manufacturing concepts and principles to the distribution function and addresses the inherent conflicts between customer service, inventory levels, and transportation costs. Zylstra’s book consists of ten chapters, with the first four chapters focusing on the issues and problems stemming from current distribution practices, while the later chapters describe and discuss his lean distribution approach.
 
 
Making Smart Decisions, and SOX 404
The Journal of Corporate Accounting and Finance, pp 75-77, Sept/Oct, 2006 (Book Review)
David M. Cannon, Joseph H. Godwin, and Stephen R. Goldberg
2006
 
Singh provides readers with principles of decision making woven into parallel stories of murder and business consulting. In the spirit of Goldratt and Cox’s The Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement (North River Press Publishing Corporation, 1993), Singh adds to the genre of using a fictional setting to convey business concepts. The main characters are students in an MBA class whose focus is on strategic business decision making. A student is murdered. Students apply the skills they learn in class to both a business case study and to solving the murder of their friend. Dr. Singh is a professor of economics and teaches decision making in his graduate and undergraduate courses.
 
 
Preventing Fraud; Small Business
The Journal of Corporate Accounting & Finance, Vol 17, No 5, pp 79-81, July/Aug 2006 (Book Review)
David M. Cannon, Joseph H. Godwin, and Stephen R. Goldberg
2006
 
What do CEOs and other executives know about fraud prevention and mitigation? The recent major accounting frauds, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, and the resultant emphasis on corporate governance have resulted in a greater accountability for corporate executives for the deterrence, detection, and mitigation of fraud. However, few CEOs and nonfinance executives are conversant with the nature of fraud and the internal controls that are necessary to prevent and mitigate its perpetration. The 17 chapters and three appendices of Biegelman and Bartow’s Executive Roadmap are a comprehensive reference on nature, causes, and consequences of fraud. The authors are former federal law enforcement officers with substantial experience in the investigation and prosecution of financial crimes.
 
 
Lean Manufacturing and Selling a Business
The Journal of Corporate Accounting & Finance, Vol 17, No 4, pp 79-81, May/June, 2006 (Book Review)
Stephen R. Goldberg, Joseph H. Godwin, and David Cannon
2005,2006
 
This book brings lean manufacturing concepts and principles to the distribution function and addresses the inherent conflicts between customer service, inventory levels, and transportation costs. Zylstra’s book consists of ten chapters, with the first four chapters focusing on the issues and problems stemming from current distribution practices, while the later chapters describe and discuss his lean distribution approach. 
 
Two Important Challenges
The Journal of Corporate Accounting & Finance, Vol 17, No 3, March/April, 2006, pp 89-91 (Book Review)
Stephen R. Goldberg, Joseph H. Godwin, and David M. Cannon
2005
 
Brown and Wilson’s new book is a comprehensive compilation of advice, knowledge, and insights relating business process outsourcing (BPO). It is a broad and deep treatment of the issues and provides numerous checklists, directories, and other resources to aid the manager in making the outsourcing decision, developing the outsourcing plan, and implementing and monitoring the plan. 
 
Improving Strategic Planning and Governance
The Journal of Corporate Accounting and Finance, Vol 17 No 2, Jan/Feb 2006, pp 71-73
Stephen R. Goldberg, Joseph H. Godwin, and David M Cannon
2005
 
Red oceans are industries currently in existence. Blue oceans represent industries not yet in existence, the unknown market. Kim and Mauborgne describe a systematic approach of moving from a “bloody red” ocean of fierce competition to a “blue ocean” of an uncontested market with opportunities for growth. The authors describe a “systematic and actionable” approach to capturing blue oceans by growing demand and breaking away from competition. They describe six principles to identify and implement blue ocean strategies: reconstruct market boundaries, focus on the big picture, create demand, identify the right strategic sequence, overcome organizational inertia, and combine execution and strategy.
 
Basis Calculations for Type A, B, and C Triangular Reorganizations
Journal of Corporate Taxation, Vol 33, No 2, March/April 2006, pp 4-14
Richard Harris and David Cannon
2006
 
The basic “stock for assets” reorganizations are the Type “A” and Type “C.” To qualify as an “A” reorganization, one corporation (the “Acquiror” or “A”) transfers stock and possibly cash or other property in exchange for part or all of the assets of another corporation (the “Target” or “T”) in a transaction that qualifies as a statutory merger or consolidation under applicable state law. Most often, the Target shareholders simply become shareholders of the Acquiror (augmented by the Target assets). State law generally requires that there be a plan of merger; notice to, a meeting of, and approval by, the Target shareholders of the plan of merger; and that dissenters to the plan be given the right to receive fair value for their shares (rather than participating in the reorganization). 
 
Check 21 Update: How Does It Affect You?
The Journal of Corporate Accounting and Finance, pp 27-31, Vol 17, No 5, July/Aug, 2006
Stephen R. Goldberg, Joseph H. Godwin, and Dori Danko
2006
 
The terrorist attacks of 9/11 grounded air transportation for several days. Physical check-clearing systems halted, resulting in losses of billions of dollars to the banking industry. Bank float of the Federal Reserve increased to 1,000 times normal levels, or $47 billion, in the days following 9/11.
 
Using Capacity Utilization to Adjust ROI Performance Drivers
The Journal of Corporate Accounting & Finance, Vol 17, No 2, pp 63-69, Jan/Feb, 2006
Marinus DeBruine and Parvez R. Sopariwala
2006
 
In a global marketplace beset with overcapacity, capacity management has become an important strategic tool for management decision-making. Some companies experiencing excess capacity will hold on in the hope of an economic recovery, while others may sell their underperforming divisions to their competitors. In such a situation, both the seller and buyer determine a range of values under varying assumptions, and the sale becomes a reality only when those ranges overlap. Accounting-based valuation methods used for this purpose rely heavily on assumptions about future profitability and growth. To the extent that those assumptions rely on past and present trends, the treatment of excess or idle capacity costs indirectly affects the valuation estimates and the successful completion of any contemplated sale. 
 
 
 
Financial Accelerator and Capital Creation in the Oil and Gas Pipeline Industry
Oil, Gas, and Energy Quarterly, March 2006
Yatin Bhagwat and Marinus Debruine
2006
 
Informational asymmetry has been attributed as the leading cause of link between financial factors and fluctuation in economic activity proxied by new investment. Based upon the theorems developed by Modigliani and Miller (1958, 1961; henceforward referred to as M&M) a company’s financial structure will not affect its market value in perfect capital markets. A company’s decisions motivated by the goal of maximizing shareholders’ wealth are independent of financial factors such as internal liquidity, debt leverage, or earnings distribution. An alternative view, based upon the assumption that internal and external sources of capital are not perfect substitutes, postulates that investment may depend upon financial factors. These factors include internal finance, access to new debt or equity, and the functioning of credit markets. Under imperfect market conditions, companies’ investment and financing decisions may be interdependent.    
 
 
Search Engine Advertising Fights Against Click Fraud
Grand Rapids, MI, Grand Rapids Business Journal, Aug 21 2006
Kurt Fanning
2006
 
With the announcement of Google’s creation of a major office for its digitalization of the University of Michigan Library and its AdWords operations in Ann Arbor, Michiganders are taking a high interest in the development of search engines at Google.
 
 
Making Smart Decisions, and SOX 404
The Journal of Corporate Accounting and Finance, pp 75-77, Sept/Oct, 2006 (Book Review)
David M. Cannon, Joseph H. Godwin, and Stephen R. Goldberg
2006
 
Singh provides readers with principles of decision making woven into parallel stories of murder and business consulting. In the spirit of Goldratt and Cox’s The Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement (North River Press Publishing Corporation, 1993), Singh adds to the genre of using a fictional setting to convey business concepts. The main characters are students in an MBA class whose focus is on strategic business decision making. A student is murdered. Students apply the skills they learn in class to both a business case study and to solving the murder of their friend. Dr. Singh is a professor of economics and teaches decision making in his graduate and undergraduate courses.
 
 
Preventing Fraud; Small Business
The Journal of Corporate Accounting & Finance, Vol 17, No 5, pp 79-81, July/Aug 2006 (Book Review)
David M. Cannon, Joseph H. Godwin, and Stephen R. Goldberg

Past Seidman Accounting Publications

 

Page last modified November 15, 2012