The Department of Classics

Classics Courses that fulfill General Education requirements

The General Education (GenEd) Program is designed to introduce students to a variety of different disciplines and ways of thinking.  The intention of this program is to form a basis of comparison and integration that fosters critical thinking and, therefore, valuable skills that will be useful beyond the university setting.

Foundation Courses
BA Cognate in Foreign Language Options
World Perspectives Designation
Theme Courses
Issues Courses

THE ARTS FOUNDATION

CLA 250 Classical Art and Archaeology. Survey of the art and archaeology of the classical world from the Bronze Age through the dissolution of the Roman Empire. Emphasis on the development of the characteristic forms of classical art, the aesthetic and historical contexts of specific works, and the techniques of classical archaeology that have revealed them. Prerequisite: fulfillment of the Freshman Writing Requirement. Three credits. Offered winter semester.

Participants in CLA 275 "Ancient Drama" perform a staged reading of Aristophanes' Lysistrata.

CLA 275 Ancient Drama. A study of the drama of ancient Greece and Rome, from playwrights such as Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, and Plautus. Readings of tragedy and comedy will be augmented by considerations of ancient dramatic theory and the possibilities of performance on the ancient and modern stage. All works read in English translation. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the Freshman Writing Requirement. Three credits. Offered winter semester in even-numbered years.

HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES FOUNDATION

CLA 121 Greek Civilization. An introduction to the major cultural accomplishments of ancient Greece from the Bronze Age through the death of Alexander the Great. Emphasis on Greek literature, art, philosophy, and political institutions both in their historical contexts and as achievements of continuing importance in the contemporary world. Three credits. Offered fall semester.

CLA 131 Roman Civilization. An introduction to the major accomplishments of ancient Rome from the Iron Age to Late Antiquity. The course examines significant aspects of Roman political, social and cultural life, both in their primary context and in terms of their relevance to society today. Three credits. Offered winter semester.

PHILOSOPHY AND LITERATURE FOUNDATION

CLA 101 Greek and Roman Mythology. An introduction to the gods and heroes of ancient Greek and Roman myths in their cultural and historical contexts, as well as their modern influence. Three credits. Offered fall semester.

CLA 201 Classical Literature. Great works from the ancient world in translation, selected from Homeric epics, plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes, and from such other classics works as Virgil's Aeneid, the Bible, and Eastern epics such as Gilgamesh. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the Freshman Writing Requirement. Three credits. Offered fall and winter semesters.

BA COGNATE REQUIREMENT IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE

GRK 101 / 102 / 201 Elementary and Intermediate Ancient Greek. An introduction to ancient Greek vocabulary, grammar, and syntax with an emphasis on reading works from the Homeric and classical periods and reading of an entire dialogue by Plato, such as Apology or Crito.  Sequence begins in the Fall semester.  Twelve credits.

HBR 101 / 102 / 201 Elementary and Intermediate Biblical Hebrew.  An introduction to the vocabulary and grammar of the Hebrew Bible with readings chosen to illustrate the different styles of Biblical writing.  Study of various methodologies of Biblical interpretation, including critical scholarship.  Twelve credits.

LAT 101 / 102 / 201 Elementary and Intermediate Latin. An introduction to Latin vocabulary, grammar, and syntax with emphasis on the language of the classical period and study of selected ancient authors.  Sequence begins in the Fall semester.  Twelve credits.

WORLD PERSPECTIVES DESIGNATION

GRK 202 Intermediate Ancient Greek II. Readings from Homer's Iliad or Odyssey, supplemented by study of early Greek history and culture. Prerequisite: Completion of GRK 201 or permission of the instructor. Three credits. Offered winter semester.

LAT 202 Intermediate Latin II. Readings in Virgil's Aeneid, supplemented by study of the history and culture of Augustan Rome. Prerequisite: Successful completion of LAT 201, or appropriate high school background. Three credits. Offered winter semester.

GENDER, SOCIETY, AND CULTURE THEME

CLA 320 Women in the Classical World. Introduction to women's lives and gender relations in ancient Greece and Rome, in both the private world of the family and the public sphere of religion and politics. Topics include myths about women; how legal, medical, and philosophical texts represent women; and what women say about themselves in their writings. Prerequisite: fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement. Three credits. Offered winter semester.

RELIGION THEME

CLA 315 Ancient Religion. A study of the religious beliefs and practices of the ancient world, emphasizing the religious traditions of Greece, Rome, Egypt, and the Near East. Topics include views of the afterlife, temples and sanctuaries, religion in daily life, "mystery" religions, and the rise of the monotheistic religions of Judaism and Christianity. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the Freshman Writing Requirement. Three credits. Offered even years, fall semester.

ISSUE: HUMAN RIGHTS

CLA 367 Thinking Like a (Roman) Lawyer. Many legal concepts we take for granted come directly from Roman Law, the influence of which continues be felt worldwide today. This course introduces legal reasoning and analysis through a discussion-based, case-by-case approach focusing on primary sources in translation. Especially valuable for prelaw students. Prerequisite: Junior standing.
 
ISSUE: IDENTITY
 
CLA 365 Stoicism, Identity, and the Happy Life. This course will address, through the life and thought of prominent Stoics, both the evolution of self and the  development of an individual’s identity from the Stoic perspective. Through readings, writing, and journaling,  students will explore the significance and relevance of key Stoic ideas about identity. Prerequisite: Junior standing.
 

Courses offered by the Department of Classics

Classical Civilization courses offered by the Honors College

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Page last modified March 13, 2014