Course Descriptions

ENG 105 Literatures in English
An introduction to literatures written in English, organized around a theme, period, author, genre, or topic. All sections emphasize close reading, careful writing, and cultural understanding. Besides enhancing these foundational skills, the course will highlight the pleasures and excitements a lifetime of reading offers. Offered fall and winter semesters. Fulfills Philosophy and Literature General Education Requirement.

ENG 203 World Literature
Readings of major drama, poetry, and novels from medieval times to the present, translated from major European and world languages. Authors such as Dante, Voltaire, Mann, Tolstoy, Kafka, Narayan, and Borges offer varied literary glimpses of foreign worlds. Fulfills Philosophy and Literature Foundation. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement. Three credits. Offered fall and winter semesters.

ENG 204 World Mythology
A comparative look at myths, folk tales, and fairy tales and how they derive from, and work on, the mind of a culture, both socially and aesthetically. Examines these tales as works of art in their own right and also as metaphors expressing a society's major values, themes, and preoccupations. Fulfills World Perspectives requirement. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement. Three credits. Offered fall and winter semesters.

ENG 212 Introduction to Shakespeare
An introduction to the foremost dramatist and poet in the English language. To complement the students' reading, film versions of several plays will ordinarily be presented. Fulfills Philosophy and Literature Foundation. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement. Three credits. Offered fall and winter semesters.

ENG 215 Foundations of Literary Study: Genre
The course examines a variety of literary genres (including fiction, poetry, drama and non-fiction) within and across a range of historical periods and cultural and national contexts. In addition to learning about genres, students will develop skills of close reading, textual support, inter-textual analysis and critical thinking. Offered fall and winter semesters. Prerequisite: WRT 150.

ENG 216 Foundations of Literary Study: Critical Approaches
This course will examine literary texts through the prism of different literary theories and other critical approaches and prepare students to undertake advanced literary interpretation and to produce literary critical writing. This course will enable students to connect literary texts and critical approaches to their historical and social contexts. Offered fall and winter semesters. Prerequisite: WRT 150.

ENG 220 British Literature I
A survey of early British literature from Beowulf in the old English period through Chaucer in the middle English period, and such authors as Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, and Milton in the Renaissance. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement. Three credits. Offered fall and winter semesters.

ENG 221 British Literature II
A survey of later British literature from the Restoration and the Eighteenth century, the Romantic and Victorian periods, modernism, and contemporary Anglophone literature. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement. Three credits. Offered fall and winter semesters.

ENG 225 American Literature I: to 1860
A survey of American literature from its beginnings to 1860. Significant attention will be given to the writings of women and minorities. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement. Three credits. Offered fall and winter semesters.

ENG 226 American Literature II: from 1860
A survey of American literature from the Realist period to the present. Significant attention will be given to the writings of women and minorities. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement. Three credits. Offered fall and winter semesters.

ENG 231 Early African American Literature
Analysis and discussion of discourse primarily written by African Americans during the formative years of this nation. Emphasizes literary discourse as a means of defining African American consciousness and community, and understanding how African Americans communities of origin shaped African-American discursive expression. Cross-listed with AAA 231. Students may not receive credit for both. Fulfills World Perspectives Designation and Philosophy and Literature Foundation. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement. Three credits. Offered fall semester.

ENG 232 Modern African American Literature
Analysis and discussion of discourse by and about African Americans primarily written during the twentieth century. Emphasizes literary discourse as a means of defining African American consciousness and community and understanding how the communities African Americans inhabit shaped their discursive expression. Cross listed with AAA 232. Students may not receive credit for both. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement. Three credits. Offered winter semester.

ENG 236 Introduction to Writing by Women
Introduction to the tradition of women writing in English. Emphasis on the cultural and historical contexts of British, American, and Anglophone women's writing. Course will include a variety of texts and authors, including significant attention to minority women writers. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the Freshman Writing Requirement. Three credits. Offered fall semester, odd years.

ENG 261 Foundations of Language Study
An introduction to linguistic principles through a study of modern English. A review of historical and contemporary writings about the language and language use. Discussion of the premises underlying various approaches to English grammar, and the use of these grammars to understand English phonology, morphology, and syntax. Three credits. Offered fall and winter semesters.

ENG 275 Ancient Drama
A study of the drama of ancient Greece and Rome, from playwrights such as Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, and Plautus. Readings of tragedy and comedy will be augmented by considerations of ancient dramatic theory and the possibilities of performance on the ancient and modern stage. All works read in English translation. Cross-listed with CLA 275. Students may not receive credit for both classes. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement. Three credits. Offered even years, winter semester.

ENG 302 Introduction to Language Arts: Teaching Writing and Childrens Literature
Introduces important research and theory, teaching strategies, issues, and materials related to both childrens literature and the teaching of writing, particularly the connection between the two. Students will learn to use literature to foster childrens reading and writing development. Does not fulfill requirement or elective in English major or minor. Offered every semester. Three credits. Prerequisites: ED 337 or PED 265 or PED 266.

ENG 303 Studies in World Literature
An in-depth comparative study of texts, themes, genres, and authors from literatures of the world in translation, including one or more from the following areas: Africa, Middle East, Asia, India, Latin America, the Caribbean, and Europe. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement and one literature course. Three Credits. Offered odd years, winter semester.

ENG 304 International Literature for Children and Young Adults
A comparative study of texts, themes and authors from children's and young adults' international literature in translation, including one or more texts from the following: Africa, Middle East, Asia, Latin America, Oceania, Canada, the Caribbean, and Eastern and Western Europe. Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement and one literature course. Three credits. Offered even years, winter semester.

ENG 307 Teaching Writing: Elementary
A study of the writing process and of current theories of rhetoric, discourse analysis, language acquisition, and reading, all applied to teaching writing on the elementary level. A tutoring practicum may be required, and students will also work on their own writing. Required for the Language Arts emphasis. Should be taken prior to School of Education admission. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement. Three credits. Offered fall and winter semesters.

ENG 308 Teaching Reading: The Necessary Skills
Application of linguistic principles to decoding and comprehension skills and to theories underlying the developmental and the language-experience approaches to teaching reading. Each student is required to tutor a pupil, administer an informal diagnostic test, and report on outside readings. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement. Four credits. Offered fall and winter semesters.

ENG 309 Teaching Literature to Children
Introduces to students the important materials (classic and contemporary), teaching strategies, issues, and research related to children's literature as well as guiding the reading of children. Required for Language Arts majors. Should be taken prior to Student Teaching (ED 403). Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement. Three credits. Offered fall and winter semesters.

ENG 310 Teaching Writing: Secondary
A study of the writing process and of current theories of rhetoric, discourse analysis, language acquisition, and reading at the secondary level. A tutoring practicum may be required, and students will also work on their own writing. Required for the secondary teacher certification English major. Should be taken prior to School of Education admission. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement. Three credits. Offered fall and winter semesters.

ENG 311 Teaching Literature to Adolescents
Introduces to students the important classic and contemporary materials (including works by women and writers of color and/or ethnic diversity), teaching strategies, issues, and research related to adolescent literature as well as the criteria for guiding the reading of adolescents. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement. Should be taken prior to Student Teaching (ED 407). Three credits. Offered fall and winter semesters.

ENG 313 British Literature: Shakespeare
An in-depth study of the range of Shakespeare's work in its historical and critical context, including selections from Comedy, Tragedy, History, Romance, and poetry. Prerequisites: 220 and 221 or permission of instructor. Three credits. Offered fall and winter semesters.

ENG 320 Studies in Poetry
Focuses upon the formal properties of poetry and studies the conventions of the genre as it develops within or across historical periods and/or cultures. Prerequisite: Two foundation courses or declared Writing major or minor. Three hours. Offered odd years, fall semester.

ENG 321 British Literature: Medieval
An in-depth study of selected texts, themes, and authors representative of British literature up to 1500. Topics vary by semester. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement and ENG 220 and 221 or permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Three credits. Offered odd years, fall semester.

ENG 322 British Literature: Renaissance
An in-depth study of selected texts, themes, and authors representative of British literature in the Renaissance. Topics vary by semester. Prerequisites: Fulfillment of freshman writing requirement and ENG 220 and 221 or permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Three credits. Offered even years, winter semester.

ENG 323 British Literature: 18th-Romantic
An in-depth study of selected texts, themes, and authors of British literature from the Restoration through the Romantic period. Topics vary by semester. Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement and ENG 220 and 221 or permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Three credits. Offered even years, fall semester.

ENG 324 British Literature: Victorian-Present
An in-depth study of texts, themes, and authors representative of British literature and post-Colonial Anglophone literature from the Victorian period through the present. Topics vary by semester. Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement and ENG 220 and 221 or permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Three credits. Offered odd years, winter semester.

ENG 325 American Literature to 1800
Intensive study of major authors, literary movements, and themes from America's pre-Colonial beginnings through the Revolution. Topics may include Native American myth and poetry; literature of discovery and conquest; Puritan writings; autobiography; captivity and slave narratives; literature of Revolution and the new Republic; early American poetry, drama, and fiction. Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement, ENG 225 and 226 or permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Three credits. Offered odd years, fall semester.

ENG 326 Nineteenth-Century American Literature
Intensive study of major authors, literary movements and themes from the post-Revolutionary War Period to 1900. Topics may include the American Renaissance; Transcendentalism; Realism; Local Color Writers; African-American slave narratives and autobiographies; the Civil War; Naturalism; and developments in nineteenth-century literary genres. Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement, ENG 225 and 226 or permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Three credits. Offered even years, winter semester.

ENG 327 Modern American Literature
Intensive study of major authors, literary movements and themes from 1900 to 1945. Topics may include Modernism, the Harlem Renaissance, the Wasteland Generation; Literature of American Expatriates; New York City; the South; the West; the Depression; World Wars I and II; and developments in modern literary genres. Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement, ENG 225 and 226 or permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Three credits. Offered even years, fall semester.

ENG 328 Contemporary American Literature
Intensive study of major authors, literary movements, and themes since 1945. Topics may include Postmodernism; Metafiction; the Beat Generation; Minimalism; Ethnic Autobiography; the 1960s and the Absurd; New Journalism; African, Latino/a and Native-American writings; Language and Confessional poetry; the Non-Fiction Novel; Travel Narratives, and developments in contemporary genres. Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement, ENG 225 and 226 or permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Three credits. Offered odd years, winter semester.

ENG 330 Studies in Fiction
Focuses on the formal properties of fiction and studies the conventions of the genre as it develops within or across historical periods and/or cultures. Prerequisite: Any two foundation courses or declared Writing major or minor. Three credits. Offered even years, winter semester.

ENG 334 American Multicultural Literature for Children and Young Adults
An examination of American multicultural literature for children and young adults. This service-learning course requires 15 hours of service reading, dramatic presentations, and other creative ways of engaging the community with literature. Prerequisites: WRT 150, and junior standing.

ENG 335 Literature of American Minorities
Studies the importance and variety of the literature of African American, Native American, Asian American, and Hispanic American authors. Emphasis on themes, literary styles, and the historical and social experience of marginality on the literature. Fulfills U.S. Diversity requirement. Part of Theme 1, Marginality and Difference. Prerequisite: Completion of the freshman writing requirement. Three credits. Offered fall semester.

ENG/WGS 336 Lesbian, Gay and Queer Literature
This interdisciplinary course makes use of literary, historical, and social scientific theories and methods in an in-depth study of lesbian, gay and queer literature with attention to historical and cultural context. Literature may include literary classics, pulp fiction, postcolonial literature, feminist fiction and postmodern narratives. Prerequisites: None. Credits: 3. Grade Type: letter. Offered: Winter, even years.

ENG 337 Contemporary Black Literature 
Studies the importance and variety of literature by Black authors from Africa, the Americas and/or Afro-Europe since 1975. Texts written earlier than 1975 are used to consider influential historical and/or social events, trends and themes, literary styles, innovative uses of popular culture, and/or expression of the experience of marginality. Fulfills Cultures - World Perspectives. Part of the Identity Issue. Offered fall and winter semesters. Prerequisite: Junior standing.  Three credits. 

ENG 340 Studies in Drama
Focuses on the formal properties of drama and studies the conventions of the genre as it develops within or across historical periods and/or cultures. Prerequisites: Two foundation courses or declared Writing major or minor. Three credits. Offered even years, fall semester.

ENG 360 Studies in Non-Fiction
Focuses on the formal properties of one or more non-fictional genre as the genre develops within or across historical periods and/or cultures. Prerequisite: Two foundation courses or declared Writing major or minor. Three credits. Offered odd years, winter semester.

ENG 362 History of the English Language
Examination of the external and internal history of the English language from Old English to present day English. Investigation of regional and social varieties of English and the question of usage in the context of cultural change. Prerequisite: 261. Three credits. Offered fall semester.

ENG 363 Applied Linguistics
Application of contemporary linguistic theory and research to issues in language, literacy, and learning. Consideration of first and second language acquisition, literacy, bilingualism, ESL, language variation including gender and nonstandard dialects, language pedagogy, and language attitudes and their relevance to classroom practices. Prerequisite: 261. Three credits. Offered winter semester.

ENG 364 Sociolinguistics
Study of sociolinguistic theories investigating the interaction of language and society. An examination of the social and cultural aspects of language and language use: social stratification, power, gender, race, ethnicity, class, geographic origins, and networks. Prerequisite: 261. Three credits. Offered winter semester.

ENG 365 Teaching English as a Second Language
Examination of the relevant issues of language, culture, and methodology for teachers of ESL students. Consideration of first and second language acquisition theory, language politics, second language teaching methodologies, and the classroom application of these issues. Prerequisite: 261. Three credits. Offered even years, fall semester.

ENG 366 English Grammar and Usage
A survey of the grammatical structure of English. The course helps students develop the ability to identify, understand, and analyze various syntactic properties of English, examines the historical and current contexts of teaching English in K--12/ESL settings, and explores the relationship between grammar and other areas of English study. Prerequisite: English 261 Study of Modern English, or with permission of instructor. Three credits. Offered fall semesters.

ENG 375 Studies in Comparative Literature
English 375 introduces the methodologies and foundations of Comparative Literature, a discipline which systematically studies literatures from different nations and/or times. Comparisons may be thematic, theoretical, historical and biographical. Students will learn means and tools for appreciating textual productions from varying perspectives. Prerequisite: WRT 150. Three credits. Offered odd years, winter semester.

ENG 378 Contemporary Latin American Literature
A survey of Latin American literature of the past three decades, in English translation, taking in a variety of nations, regions, and cultures, including Afro-Latin and indigenous voices. Genres include the novel, the short story, poetry, drama, testimonial narrative, speeches, folklore, and film. Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement and one literature course cross listed with SPA 330 and LAS 375. Students may not receive credit for both. Three credits. Offered even years, winter semester.

ENG 380 Topics in Literature
Studies of selected authors, concepts, movements, periods, theories, or genres. Topics will be announced in the class schedule and prerequisites may be listed. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: One literature foundation course. Three credits.

ENG 381 Regional Discourses in US Civil Rights
Regional differences in US Civil Rights' discourse. Part of theme 13, Civil and Human Rights Movement. Prerequisite: WRT 150. Three credits. Offered even years, fall semester.

ENG 382 Nature Writing
Focuses on the literature that deals with the relationship between human beings and the natural world. Includes literary non-fiction, nature poetry, environmental fiction, and other forms of literature that illuminate both human and non-human nature. In addition to writing analytical papers, students will try several forms of nature writing. Part of Earth and Environment theme. Three credits. Offered winter semester.

ENG 383 ``Make It New'': Literary Modernism
From the cafes and ``little magazines'' of Paris emerged writers forging a new way to express the new realities of the twentieth century. Exploration of the literature in its cultural context. Part of Changing Ideas: Changing Worlds theme. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement. Three credits. Offered fall semester.

ENG 384 Literary Responses to War and Peace
Course uses literary texts to explore the causes and consequences of war from a variety of perspectives. Works may include short stories, novels, poetry, non-fiction essays, autobiographies. Part of theme 5, War and Peace. Three credits. Offered winter semester.

ENG 385 Writing and Revolution in the Americas
Examines literary responses to various forms of revolutionary change in the Americas. Students consider the ways in which writers have responded to major transformations in societies across the Western Hemisphere. Profound societal changes are examined against the backdrop of everyday life and the persistence of the status quo. Part of theme 7, Continuity and Change in the Americas. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement. Three credits. Offered winter semester.

ENG 386 Literary Responses to Death and Dying
This course uses literary texts to acquaint students with the variety of responses of different cultures to issues surrounding death and dying. Works may include nonfiction, memoir, poetry, drama, and fiction. Part of the Death and Dying Theme. Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement. Three credits. Offered even years, winter semester.

ENG 390 Topics in Language and Rhetoric
Variable content. Course will focus on a problem (or problems) in the history or structure of English, or on a specific problem in the practice or theory of rhetoric. Among such topics are the following: dialects, Black English, artificial languages (Esperanto-Newspeak), semantics, language and politics. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement. Three credits.

ENG 392 Language and Power
Examines language as a means of achieving personal and cultural freedom and as a tool for controlling and oppressing others. Students study various theories of language use and explore the tension between our right to use language freely and our need to protect ourselves from the way others use language. Part of Freedom and Social Control theme. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement. Three credits. Offered winter semester.

ENG 399 Independent Studies
Before registration, the student must arrange for supervision by a faculty member and submit a contract (available in the English office) specifying the scope of the proposed study. No more than three credits in English 399 may be applied to the major or minor. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the freshman writing requirement. One to four credits. Offered fall and winter semesters.

ENG 400 Language Arts for Teaching
Integrates the theories of teaching elementary children the skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Prerequisites: ENG 307, 308, and 309; or ENG 302 and ENG 308. Three credits. Offered fall and winter semesters.

ENG 436 Women and Literature
An in-depth study of major women writers and their historical, cultural, and artistic contributions. Significant attention will be given to the writings of minorities. Prerequisites: Completion of foundation courses and one 300-level literature course. Offered even years, winter semester.

ENG 440 Studies in Major Author(s)
An in-depth study of one or two major literary figures, with an emphasis on biography, major works, and influence. Prerequisites: Completion of foundation courses and one 300-level literature course. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Three credits. Offered even years, fall semester.

ENG 445 Studies in Literary Criticism and Theory
An in-depth study of critical and theoretical approaches to literature, with an emphasis on the development of theories of literature from classicism to post-modernism. Prerequisites: Completion of foundation courses and one 300-level literature course. Three credits. Offered odd years, winter semester.

ENG 461 Language and Gender
Examination of theoretical approaches to the dynamics of language and gender. Investigation of the relationship of language and gender with social categories such as age, ethnicity, class, and sexuality. Application of social and linguistic theories to analyses of data with particular attention to contexts of the classroom, workplace, and media. Prerequisite: English 261. Three credits. Offered winter semester.

ENG 465 Teaching Second Language Reading and Writing
Examination of current theory, research, and practice in second language literacy development. Students will gain an understanding of the cognitive, linguistic, and sociocultural factors involved in learning to read and write in a second language, and develop informed practices for teaching second language readers and writers at different levels. Offered winter semester. Prerequisites: ENG 261, ENG 363 or ENG 365.

ENG 467 Language Disorders and English Literacy
An Examination of common speech/language disorders in the school-aged population having an impact on English literacy acquisition. Investigation of interface between ESL and language disorders, compounded by language attrition. Application to classroom communication skills, acquisition of literacy, and working with other school professionals. Offered fall semester. Prerequisite: ENG 261. Credits: 3

ENG 469 ESL Practicum Seminar
Practicum experience for those interested in teaching second language learners of English. Focus on integrating ESL theory with practice and implementing instructional approaches that support literacy and academic development of ESL learner. Emphasis on reflective practices and development of critical perspectives. Does not lead to State of Michigan teaching certification. Offered fall semester of odd-numbered years. Prerequisite: ENG 465. Credits: 3

ENG 490 Internship
A supervised work experience in an area of a student's potential career interest. Initiated by the student, who plans the work experience with the advisor, the faculty sponsor chosen to supervise the internship, and the supervisor at the worksite. As a rough guide, the student should expect to spend 45 hours per semester in the internship and supporting academic work for each credit awarded. Credit is awarded only when the student, the faculty sponsor, and the work supervisor have completed evaluations of the internship. One to three credits. Offered every semester.

ENG 495 Literature and Language(Capstone)
This course will be a culminating experience for all English majors. Students will reflect on their experience as English majors, create a senior project, and present their findings at a departmental conference. Prerequisites: English foundation courses and senior standing.

ENG 499 Writing Project
Advanced, supervised work on a substantial piece of writing, such as a novel or play, or a series of articles, short stories, or poems. Students register for this course upon recommendation of a faculty member. Three credits. Offered fall and winter semesters.

ENG 600 Graduate Literary Studies Seminar
This course will introduce graduate students to current literary studies by explicating historical changes in the field of English in both literary content and critical discourse. Students will explore these changes by studying key concepts in the discipline and by completing a research project.

ENG 603 Seminar in British Literature
Aims at a synthesis of the development of British literature through a study of important literary themes, examining them closely in major works representative of the periods of British literature. Seminar presentation and research paper are required of each student. Prerequisite: Completion of English major or minor or consent of instructor. Three credits. Offered every other year.

ENG 605 Seminar in American Literature
Aims at a synthesis of the development of American literature through a study of important literary themes, examining them closely in major works representative of the periods of American literature. Seminar presentation and research paper are required of each student. Prerequisite: Completion of English major or minor or consent of instructor. Three credits. Offered every other year.

ENG 612 Women Writers
An in-depth study of selected works of women writers with attention to the literary and social contexts in which they wrote. Issues concerning the development of literature written by women and its status with regard to the canon will be addressed. Prerequisite: Completion of English major or minor or consent of instructor. Three credits. Offered every other year.

ENG 614 Literature of American Ethnic Minorities
An in-depth study of selected pieces of African-American, Hispanic, Asian-American, Native American or immigrant American literature. Issues concerning the development of minority literature and its status with regard to the canon will be addressed. Prerequisite: Completion of English major or minor or consent of instructor. Three credits. Offered every other year.

ENG 616 World Literature in English
An in-depth study of selected pieces of Asian, African, or South American literature. Issues concerning the development of Third World literature and its status with regard to the canon will be addressed. Offered every other year.

ENG 621 Literary Theory and the Teaching of Literature
A study of literary theories with emphasis on current theories (including psychoanalysis, feminism, reader-response theory, Marxism, and deconstruction) in order to learn how these perspectives can be used in the classroom to enrich students' reading of literature. Prerequisite: Completion of English major or minor or consent of instructor. Three credits. Offered every other year.

ENG 624 Genre Studies
Intensive study of the historical development of a selected genre (poetry, drama, fiction, literary non-fiction) and of the nature of the genre, focusing on selected works. Prerequisite: Completion of English major or minor or consent of instructor. Three credits. Offered every other year.

ENG 631 Teaching Writing
A study of current writing theory and its implication for teaching writing. Includes application of theory in classroom teaching and work on the student's own writing. Prerequisite: Completion of English major or minor or consent of instructor. Three credits. Offered every other year.

ENG 632 Summer Invitational Writing Institute
The Summer Invitational Institute gathers teachers, grades K--16, to develop presentations based on their best practices in teaching writing, to facilitate analysis of current research in the teaching of writing and to help teachers to better link their work as writers to work as teachers of writing. Prerequisite: Application and interview. Three credits. Offered summer semester.

ENG 633 Advanced Writing
An intensive writing course designed to help teachers develop their own writing using various forms of creative and expository writing. Prerequisite: Completion of English major or minor or consent of instructor. Three credits. Offered every other year.

ENG 641 History of the English Language
Presents the assumptions and historical background necessary to an understanding of the changes in the English language. Also emphasizes one aspect of linguistic change, such as vocabulary and dictionaries, varieties of English, grammatical change, or phonology. Prerequisite: Completion of English major or minor or consent of instructor. Three credits. Offered every other year.

ENG 651 Literary Period Seminar
Intensive study of a period of British, American, or world literature. Prerequisite: Completion of English major or minor or consent of instructor. Three credits. Offered every other year.

ENG 655 History of Literary Criticism and Theory
A study of literary criticism and theory from all major historical periods (Greek, Roman, medieval, Renaissance, Eighteenth Century, Romantic, Late Nineteenth Century), and of the various modern and contemporary schools. Emphasis on philosophical assumptions underlying literary theories and on application of critical approaches to literary works. Prerequisite: Completion of English major or minor or consent of instructor. Three credits. Offered every other year (odd years).

ENG 660 Principles of Educational Linguistics
An introduction to contemporary linguistics and how linguistic concepts are used in educational contexts. Major component areas of phonetics, phonology, morphology, semantics, syntax, pragmatics, language variation, and language acquisition will be examined. Pedagogical relevance and implications for teaching are an integral part of linguistic analysis. Required of those seeking Michigan ESL endorsement. Three credits. Offered fall semester.

ENG 661 Author or Topic Seminar
Intensive study of a work (or works) of a single author or focused literary topic. Prerequisite: Completion of English major or minor or consent of instructor. Three credits. Offered every other year.

ENG 662 Structure of English
An advanced course in contemporary syntactic analysis of English. The course focuses on both descriptive and prescriptive properties of English, primarily in the generative-transformational framework. It also addresses pedagogical issues in teaching grammar in ESL and other settings. While designed for TESOL majors, other students of English, such as prospective English and language arts majors, may also find it beneficial. Prerequisite: English 660, or with permission of instructor. Three credits. Offered spring semester.

ENG 663 Shakespeare
An in-depth study of selected plays, focusing on historical context, interpretive methods, and the development of Shakespeare's genius. Prerequisite: Completion of English major or minor or consent of instructor. Three credits. Offered every other year.

ENG 664 Sociolinguistics and Language Teaching
The study of sociolinguistic theories investigating the interaction of language and society in the classroom, grades K--12. An examination of the social and cultural aspects of language, language use, and teaching. Particular emphasis on English as a second language, bilingual and multilingual educational situations, and cultural influences on learning, communications, and ideology. Required of those seeking Michigan ESL endorsement. Prerequisite: Completion of 660 or equivalent. Three credits. Offered winter semester.

ENG 665 Second Language Acquisition
An examination of the major theories of second language acquisition and various factors that influence the learning process among different age groups of learners from different first language backgrounds. The relationship between SLA research and its pedagogical implications for teachers is also addressed. Required of those seeking Michigan ESL endorsement. Prerequisite: Completion of 660 or equivalent. Three credits Offered winter semester.

ENG 668 Second Language Assessment
An examination of the basic concepts in language testing, with special focus on K--12 and adult learners of English as a second language. Areas of coverage include test selection, evaluation, development, and application. Both qualitative and quantitative methods will be addressed, though the latter are the primary concern. Required of those seeking Michigan ESL endorsement. Prerequisite: Completion of 660 or equivalent. Three credits. Offered fall semester.

ENG 695 Master's Thesis
Preparation of thesis for M.A. Degree, Track 2. Carried out under supervision of thesis director. A student preparing a thesis must register for at least one credit per semester (including spring/summer) and must have registered for a total of at least 6 credits before scheduling thesis defense. Prerequisite: Completion of 27 credits and approval of thesis proposal. Offered every semester.

Reading Skills

ENG 095 Reading Skills I
Required for entering students whose scores on a standardized test indicate a need for a developmental reading program. Includes work in the areas of comprehension, word study, and vocabulary development. Three (non-graduation) credits. Credit/no credit. Offered fall and winter semesters.

ENG 097 Reading Skills II
A continuation of 095 for those students needing further instruction in developmental reading. Also required for students whose standardized test scores indicate that they may have difficulty comprehending minimum college-level materials. Three (non-graduation) credits. Credit/no credit. Offered fall and winter semesters.

ENG 099 College Efficiency and Reading Training
For students whose standardized test scores indicate proficiency with minimum college level material, but who want to learn to make the most efficient use of their reading and thinking skills. Emphasis on reading efficiency, vocabulary development and critical reading. Three (non-graduation) credits. Offered fall and winter semesters.

English as a Second Language

ESL 094 English as a Second Language (ESL): Skills I
Provides non-native speakers of English with an opportunity to systematically develop vocabulary skills necessary for the reading demands of college work. Three (non-graduation) credits.

ESL 095 English as a Second Language (ESL): Speaking and Listening Skills
Designed to improve the aural/oral skills of non-native speakers of English. Course work includes practice of sound patterns, conversational skills, and listening comprehension. Three (non-graduation) credits

ESL 098 English as a Second Language (ESL)
Composition. Provides non-native speakers of English with a practical review of English grammar and instruction in paragraph and essay organization and writing. As part of the course, students work one hour per week with a peer consultant in the Writing Center. Four (non-graduation) credits. Offered winter semester. .