History

Stephen Staggs, Office # D-1-120 MAK, Phone # 331-3626, staggss@gvsu.edu

Visiting Assistant Professor - Early Modern History

Fields:  Early Modern Europe and Colonial North America

Degrees:  BA, History and Education, Calvin College, 1994
                  MA, History, Western Michigan University, 2002
                  PhD, History, Western Michigan University, 2013 

Teaching: 

I teach courses in World, European, United States, and North American Native History and, in particular, the history and culture of the Natives and Europeans living in and around New Netherland and New York during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

Research:

I specialize in the religious and socio-cultural history of the Dutch Republic and Northeastern North America to about 1750.  My research focuses on Native-European relations in general, and upon the history, culture, and interaction of the Dutch with their Native and European neighbors.

Selected Publications and Presentations:

“'Heijdenen’ and ‘Wilden’: Imagining Indians in the Dutch Republic and New Netherland.” Noontime Series Presentation, Calvin Academy for Lifelong Learning, Grand Rapids, MI, October 2012.

 “The View from the Dutch Republic: Protestant Conceptualization of Indians.” 35th Annual New Netherland Seminar, New York, NY, September 2012.

“Indian-Dutch Relations in New Netherland and New York during the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century.” Koninklijke Scholengemeenschaap Apeldoorn, Apeldoorn, The Netherlands, March 2011.

“Adjusting to American Academic Cultures.” Studiedag Decanen, Seminar For Deans in Dutch Schools, Fulbright Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, January 2011.

“Indian-Dutch Relations in New Netherland and New York during the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century.” Gomarus College, Groningen, The Netherlands, November 2010, and at Zeldenrust Steelantcollege, Terneuzen, Zeeland, The Netherlands, November 2010.

With James Palmitessa, "The Successes and Challenges of Teaching World History in the Twenty-First Century: Two Case Studies from Western Michigan," World History Connected 3/1 (October 2005).

Page last modified September 6, 2013