Foundational Interdisciplinary Sequences

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Note from the Director: Hi!  You'll notice that there are limited options for Foundational Interdisciplinary Sequences at this point in time.  That is because we opened selection in early April (when you should have received an e-mail) and have been taking preferences for 2 and 1/2 months already, but please realize that there are no bad options for sequences.  The open ones below are wonderful, interdisciplinary topics and are taught by outstanding faculty.  In fact, I'm surprised that some of these have not closed yet.  Please complete your preference form as soon as possible because some of the open ones will close soon.  Take care. 
 

Dr. J

 

Foundational Interdisciplinary Sequences 2015-2016

 

African Civilization, section 01

Fall Semester:      HNR 254/255, section 01

Winter Semester:  HNR 274/275, section 01

Note: You must take section 01 for both semesters.

Schedule (First Semester): MW 3:00-4:15pm and 4:30-5:45pm HON 220

Schedule (Second Semester): MW 3:00-4:15pm and 4:30-5:45pm HON 220

Fulfills: Arts, History, Philosophy & Literature, World Perspectives, WRT 150 (with B or better), SWS, Issues

Steeve Buckridge, Associate Professor

David Alvarez, Professor

This course surveys the history of African civilizations to the nineteenth century. It will concentrate on the political, economic, cultural, and social development of specific African societies before European conquest of the continent. The course will be more thematic than chronological. The course will open with a discussion of the myths associated with African people and will explore a wide range of topics such as migration, languages, religious concepts, dress, art, social organization, and the process of state formation particularly in East and West Africa. The class will also examine the spread of Christianity, Islam, and Judaism in Africa. Other topics will include the Atlantic Slave trade, slavery in Africa, gender and the division of labor. The course format will include lectures, papers, group discussions as well as audio-visuals and music. This course is the first part of the two-part survey of African History specifically designed for Honors.   

 

Alliance and Conflict: World Construction in Religion and Society  *THIS COURSE IS CLOSED*

Fall Semester:          HNR 280 section 04 (Must also enroll in a section of Live, Learn, Lead)

Winter Semester:      HNR 280 sections 03 and 04      

Schedule (First Semester): MWF 12-12:50 HON 218

Schedule (Second Semester): MWF 11:00-11:50 and 12:00-12:50 HON 218

Fulfills: Arts, History, SWS, World Perspectives, HST 380, Social Science (or Philosophy & Literature if needed), WRT 150 (with B or better), Issues

Jeremiah Cataldo, Assistant Professor of History and Meijer Honors College

 

 

American Civilization, section 01

Fall Semester:        HNR 213 and 214, section 01: American Civilization I

Winter Semester:  HNR 223 and 224, section 01: American Civilization II

NOTE: You must take section 01 for both semesters.  

Schedule (First Semester): MWF 9:00-10:50am HON 218

Schedule (Second Semester): MWF 9:00-10:50am HON 218

Fulfills: Arts, History, Philosophy & Literature, U.S. Diversity, HST 205, HST 206, ENG 225, ENG 226, WRT 150 (with B or better), SWS, Issues

Avis Hewitt, Associate Professor

Douglas Montagna, Associate Professor of History

Fall: Course provides a survey of American history, literature, and intellectual progress from European Colonization through Reconstruction. 

Winter: Continues the study of American Civilization begun in HNR 213. Emphasis is on philosophy and arts in American culture.

Our course is a rich and comprehensive journey through the evolution of American cultural life, especially as reflected in our literature and history. We examine a variety of narratives that serve as markers of our sense of the past and the formation of the American self (or selves), and we explicate works of fiction, poetry, and drama that serve as particularly articulate responses to being not only American but also human. Topics and works range from the earliest colonies to the twenty-first century. Both history and literature thrive on relentless investigation and interpretation. We are interested in what our students think and have to say about the topics we study. Our classes are full of research, discussion, presentations, group work, and writing—both formal and informal. From George Washington’s remarkable career, the life of a late eighteenth century Midwife, and the experiences of a family of American diplomats in Nazi Germany to provocative permutations of Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, David Mamet’s Glengarry Glen Ross, and Don DeLillo’s White Noise, we look deeply into both sorts of “major hitters”—that is, the giants of history and literature—as well as into the daily lives of Americans in a variety of eras. Students often find that our course is not only about the knowledge they acquire and the skills they develop, but also about the delight of being part of a community of learners where good will and good times get privileged along with proficiency. 

American Civilization, section 02   *THIS COURSE IS CLOSED*

Fall Semester:        HNR 213 and 214, section 02: American Civilization I

Winter Semester:  HNR 223 and 224, section 02: American Civilization II

NOTE: You must take section 02 for both semesters.  

Schedule (First Semester): MW 3:00-5:45pm HON 219

Schedule (Second Semester): MW 3:00-5:45pm HON 219

Fulfill: Arts, History, Philosophy & Literature, U.S. Diversity, HST 205, HST 206, ENG 225, ENG 226, WRT 150 (with B or better), SWS, Issues

Steve Tripp, Professor of History

Michael Webster, Professor

 

Big History  *THIS COURSE IS CLOSED*                       

Fall Semester: HNR 280 Sections 07 and 08

Winter Semester: HNR 280 Sections 07 and 08

Schedule (First Semester): TR 2:30-3:45 and 4:00-5:15pm HON 218

Schedule (Second Semester): TR 2:30-3:45 and 4:00-5:15pm HON 218

Fulfills: History, Philosophy & Literature, World Perspectives, HST 380, WRT 150 (w/ B or better), SWS, Physical Science, Issues

Craig Benjamin, Professor

 

Classical World    *THIS COURSE IS CLOSED*

Fall Semester:          HNR 211 and 212, section 01

Winter Semester:    HNR 221 and 222, section 01

Schedule (First Semester): MWF 1:00-1:50 and 2:00-2:50pm HON 220

Schedule (Second Semester): MWF 1:00-2:50pm HON 220

Fulfills: Arts, History, Philosophy & Literature, World Perspectives, HST 380, WRT 150 (with B or better), SWS, Issues
Diane Rayor, Professor (Fall)

Chuck Pazdernik, Professor (Fall)

Charles Ham, (Winter)

Peter Anderson, (Winter)

This course takes a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of the history, literature, intellectual history, philosophy, and arts of the Classical period with emphasis on Greeks and Romans. This approach includes close and extensive reading of primary sources (such as literary texts and artifacts) and secondary sources (including history and art history textbooks).

 

Culture and Civilization - Anthropological Explorations   *THIS COURSE IS CLOSED*

Fall Semester: ANT 215 section 01: Origins of Civilization (Honors) and ANT 204 section 10: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (Honors)

Winter Semester: ANT 204 section 09: Cultural Anthropology (Honors)

Schedule (First Semester): MWF 10:00-11:50am LMH 253

Schedule (Second Semester): TR 8:30-9:45am LMH 253

Deana Weiber (Fall)

Mark Schwartz (Fall)

Tara Hefferan (Winter)

Anthropology is concerned with how people from various cultures (in any time and/or place) cope with and solve their day to day problems.  Anthropologists are trained specialists who conduct studies of the culture and adaptation of humans to a variety of environments. They use both a humanistic and a scientific approach in their understanding of human behavior.

ANT 215 examines the development of world civilizations using historic, archaeological and other perspectives that inform us about the past. This course provides an overview of select civilizations of the ancient world, including Egypt and other parts of Africa, Mesopotamia, the Indus Valley, Mesoamerica and South America. Emphasis will be placed on how archaeologists use material culture (i.e. artifacts) to examine the social and cultural organization of these societies. Additionally, we will look at the current research that is examining the processes involved in the rise and fall of civilizations and the factors by which complex societies evolved in different parts of the world. It is critical to examine the consequences of decisions made by our ancestors in these early civilizations, their successes and failures, so that we may better understand our own modern behavior as we examine it in ANT 204.

ANT 204 focuses on cultural diversity and how anthropologists attempt to understand social and cultural systems in modern populations.  Students will explore theories of culture change, patterns of kinship, and the place of religious, economic, and political institutions and go outside the classroom to explore this diversity in our community. We will explore many issues in terms of case studies from various regions of the world but the course will continually emphasize the application of these concepts in our own culture and social systems. Frequently, we will make comparisons with U.S. culture and students will be asked to bring their knowledge and experiences of culture and food systems to bear upon social issues during classroom discussion. 

European Civilization, section 01    *THIS COURSE IS CLOSED*

Fall Semester:        HNR 215 and 216, section 01: European Civilization I   

Winter Semester:  HNR 225 and 226, section 01: European Civilization II 

Note: You must take section 01 for both semesters.

Schedule (First Semester): TR 10:00am-12:45pm HON 218

Schedule (Second Semester): TR 10:00am-12:45pm HON 218

Fulfills: Arts, History, Philosophy & Literature, World Perspectives, HST 380, ENG 221, WRT 150 (with B or better), SWS, Issues

Ellen Adams, Assistant Professor

David Eick, Associate Professor of Modern Languages and Literatures

 

European Civilization, section 02

Fall Semester:      HNR 215 and 216, section 02: European Civilization I   

Winter Semester:  HNR 225 and 226, section 02 European Civilization II

NOTE: You must take section 02 for both semesters.

Schedule (First Semester): TR 1:00-3:45pm HON 220

Schedule (Second Semester): TR 1:00-3:45pm HON 220

Fulfills: Arts, History, Philosophy & Literature, World Perspectives, HST 380, ENG 221, WRT 150 (with B or better), SWS, Issues

Grace Coolidge, Associate Professor of History

Gabriela Pozzi, Modern Languages and Literature

While this course covers all of European history and culture, we put a special emphasis on Spain. Spain occupied a unique historical and geographical position as the cultural crossroad of East and West, where the three “peoples of the book” (Christians, Jews and Muslims) coexisted in complex patterns of harmony and tension.  The Spanish empire dominated the early modern world, and Spain was home to a rich cultural Renaissance.  By contrast, twentieth-century Spain survived a brutal civil war and the longest-running Fascist dictatorship in European history to become a thriving modern democracy.  We explore the twists and turns of Spanish history and compare and contrast Spain to the rest of Europe, learning about its uniqueness as well as about the common ties that bind it to the mainland.  The course covers Spanish and European history and culture from the medieval period to the present day European union.  We learn how to cure love-sickness, follow a cross-dressing nun in her adventures across Spain and the new world, meet the famous witch Celestina, and wrestle with the Frankenstein monster.  In the 19th century the class uses a six-week simulation in which students play the parts of workers and factory owners caught up in the Industrial Revolution, making choices and living with the consequences in this fast-changing culture.   We explore the tragic, disillusioned poetry of World War One, the impact of the Holocaust, and the slow rebuilding of a traumatized Europe into today’s European Union.  The class puts special emphasis on learning to write historical and literary essays and to handle a college-level reading load, skills that will benefit students in any discipline they pursue.

 

Focus on East Asia

Fall Semester:           HNR 256, 257 section 01

Winter Semester:       HNR 276, 277, section 01

NOTE: You must take section 1 for both semesters.

Schedule (First Semester): MW 3:00-5:45pm HON 218

Schedule (Second Semester): MW 3:00-5:45pm HON 218

Fulfills: Arts, History, Philosophy & Literature, World Perspectives, HST 380, WRT 150 (with B or better), SWS, Issues

Craig Benjamin, Associate Professor of History

Yan Liang, Assistant Professor of Modern Languages and Literatures

Jeremy Robinson, Associate Professor of Japanese

This course explores the history and culture of China, Korea, Japan, Southeast Asia, and Central Asia between c. 50,000 BCE and today. East Asian history and culture is often neglected in mainstream Western education systems, but over recent decades we have come to realize the fundamental significance of this region to global history. China has the longest continuous history of any civilization, and for millennia was the wealthiest and most powerful empire on Earth.  Today one-fifth of the world’s population lives in China, a nation undergoing rapid economic growth and social and political transformation.  China now has the second largest economy on the world, and Japan the third.  This course explores the extraordinary technological and philosophical contributions the eastern regions of Eurasia have made to world culture through a detailed consideration of the political, military, economic and cultural history of China and the other major eastern hemisphere nations.

 

During the first semester, Professor Benjamin explores the rich history of China from the Paleolithic Era to the Tang Dynasty, including China’s engagement with ancient Central Asia along the Silk Roads.  At the same time, Professor Liang will offer a comprehensive overview of the literature of China from ancient times through to the twenty-first century.  In the second semester, Professor Benjamin follows Chinese history from the Tang Dynasty through to today, and also investigates the long and fascinating history of Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia.  At the same time, Professor Robinson will offer a comprehensive overview of the literature and culture of Korea and Japan.   By the end of this two-semester course students will have gained a deep understanding and appreciation of the fascinating 50,000 year-long history of this dynamic region, and the extraordinary contributions its peoples have made to global culture.  This course fulfills the General Education Program's Foundations (Philosophy and Literature Emphasis) and World Perspective (Culture Emphasis), and WRT 150 designations. You will also learn how to research and write extensive and rigorous research essays. 

 

Food for Thought    *THIS COURSE IS CLOSED*

Fall Semester: HNR 280 02 (Must also enroll in a section of Live, Learn, Lead)

Winter Semester: HNR 280 sections 01 and 02 (SWS)

Schedule (Fall): TR 4:00-5:15pm HON 220

Schedule (Winter): TR 8:30-9:45am and 10:00-11:15am HON 214

Fulfills: World Perspectives, History, SWS, US Diversity, Social Science, WRT 150 (w/ B or better), Issues

Amy McFarland, Professor

 

History of Science         *THIS COURSE IS CLOSED*

Fall Semester:         HNR 258 and 259, section 01

Winter Semester:   HNR 278 and 279, section 01

NOTE: You must take section 01 for both semesters.

Schedule (First Semester): TR 8:30-9:45am and 10:00-11:15am HON 148

Schedule (Second Semester): TR 8:30-9:45am and 10:00-11:15am HON 148

Fulfills: Arts, History, Philosophy & Literature, World Perspectives, WRT 150 (with B or better), SWS, Issues

Sheldon Kopperl, Professor of Biomedical Sciences

Andrew D. Spear, Assistant Professor of Philosophy

 

 

Islamic Middle East    *THIS COURSE IS CLOSED*

Fall Semester:         HNR 209 and 210, section 01

Winter Semester:   HNR 219 and 220, section 01

Schedule (First Semester): MW 12:00-1:15 and 1:30– 2:45 HON 219

Schedule (Second Semester): MW 12:00-1:15 and 1:30-2:45pm HON 219

Fulfills: Arts, History, Philosophy & Literature, World Perspectives, HST 211, WRT 150 (with B or better), SWS, Issues

Coeli Fitzpatrick, Associate Professor of Philosophy

Majd Al-Mallah

 

Latin American Civilization

Fall Semester:         HNR 280 10 & 11

Winter Semester:    HNR 280 17 & 18

Fulfills: Art, History, Philosophy & Literature, World Perspectives, HST 230, WRT 150 (with a B or better), SWS, Issues

Schedule (First Semester): MWF 1:00-1:50pm (ASH 1320) and 2:00-2:50pm (PAD 261)

Schedule (Second Semester):  MWF 1:00-1:50pm and 2:00-2:50pm LHH 122

David Stark, Associate Professor of History

Jose Lara

Medar Serrata, Associate Professor

This is a two-course sequence on Latin American civilization and culture from pre-conquest times to the present. We will survey various aspects of Latin American civilization to include the history, literature, culture, and arts of Latin America.  Given the vastness of Latin America the approach of the course is thematic and chronological rather than regional. The first part will address the development of the great Amerindian civilizations, the encounter between Amerindians, Europeans, and Africans, the making of a colonial society, the struggles leading to the collapse of colonial rule, and the wars of independence. The second part will pay attention to five specific and interconnected themes: the struggle to define the nation, imperialism and intervention, divergent paths of political and economic development, resistance and revolution, and confronting the challenges of modernity. Upon completion of the two sequences students will have a comprehensive understanding of how the complex interaction between different cultures melding in the Americas shaped the colonial societies, and how some elements of this legacy persisted or were transformed by different social groups before and after independence.

 

Making of Europe I    *THIS COURSE IS CLOSED*

Fall Semester:        HNR 217 01 Making of Europe I 

Winter Semester:  HNR 218 and 228, section 01 Making of Europe II: The High Middle Ages

Schedule (Fall and Winter Semester): TR 10:00-11:15am HON 220

Fulfills: Arts, History, Philosophy & Literature, World Perspectives, HST 203, ENG 220, Issues

Benjamin Lockerd, Professor of English

Mark Pestana, Professor of Philosophy

Fall Semester:             HNR 227 01 Making of Europe III: Early Renaissance

Winter Semester:       HNR 228 01 Making of Europe IV: SWS

Schedule (Fall and Winter Semester):   TR 8:30-9:45am HON 220

Benjamin Lockerd, Professor of English

Mark Pestana, Professor of Philosophy

HNR 217: The Making of Europe I

 

This is the first course in a 4-course sequence that will address the development of European culture from the end of the Roman Empire to the beginning of the modern era.  This first course seeks to give students some knowledge of the Roman Empire and then to enter into a study of the early Middle Ages, from about 450 A.D. to about 1100 A.D.  The approach of the course will be interdisciplinary, with professors from all the major disciplines within the Humanities.  In this way, we hope to achieve a comprehensive view of the development of European civilization during this period.

                Each semester of the Making of Europe sequence involves all four disciplines, but each of the four semesters also focuses particularly on one of the four disciplines, as follows:

                --HNR 217: History

                --HNR 218: Philosophy

                --HNR 227: Art

                --HNR 228: Literature

 

HNR 218: The Making of Europe II

 

This course will examine the late Middle Ages (sometimes called the High Middle Ages) in Europe, from approximately 900 to approximately 1300 A.D.  We will study and discuss the cultural, artistic, religious, intellectual, and political developments that took place at this time.  The course will be interdisciplinary, involving discussion of history, philosophy, art, architecture, music, and literature of the period. The course emphasizes the great philosophical works of the era, especially the Summa Theologica of St. Thomas Aquinas. We also read selections from Dante's Divine Comedy.

 

HNR 227: The Making of Europe III

 

This course will examine the transition from the late Middle Ages to the early Renaissance period in Europe.  The Renaissance begins at different times in different regions: around 1300 in Italy, but not until the late 1400s in England.  Historically, we will look at roughly that period, but in literature we will move forward into the late 1500s. We will study the various cultural, artistic, religious, intellectual, and political developments of the period, with an emphasis on the romance epic, the development of polyphony, and Renaissance painting.  The course is interdisciplinary, involving history, art, architecture, music, philosophy, and literature.  There will be a pronounced emphasis on the great artistic accomplishments of this period.

 

HNR 228: The Making of Europe IV

 

This course will examine the late Renaissance period in Europe, from approximately 1500 to approximately 1700.  Major topics in the course will be the Protestant Reformation, the consolidation of the modern European nation states, and Humanism.  We will study the cultural, artistic, intellectual, and political developments of the era.  The course is interdisciplinary, involving history, art, architecture, music, philosophy, and literature. There will be an emphasis on literary works of the period, including those of Shakespeare and Milton.

 

National Security      *THIS COURSE IS CLOSED*                      

Fall Semester: HNR 280 Section 16 (must also enroll in a section of Live, Learn, Lead)

Winter Semester: HNR 280 Sections 11 and 12 

Schedule (Fall): TR 11:30am-12:45pm HON 220

Schedule (Winter): TR 11:30am-12:45pm 1:00-2:15pm HON 148

Fulfills: History, 1 Social Science, HST 380, World Perspectives, WRT 150 (w/ B or better), SWS, Issues

Jonathan White, Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies, Honors College

 

Social Product Innovation (SPI)  *THIS COURSE IS CLOSED*

Fall Semester: HNR 280 14 (Must take a Live, Learn, Lead.)

Winter Semester: HNR 280 09 & 10

Schedule (Fall Semester): W 3:00-5:50pm HON 148

Schedule (Winter Semester): TR 11:30am-12:45pm, 1:00-2:15pm HON 219

Requirements Fulfilled: History, Art, SWS, World Perspectives, Social Science, WRT 150 (w/ B or better), Issues

Paul Lane, Professor

 

Theory and Practice of Rights         *THIS COURSE IS CLOSED*           

Fall Semester: HNR 280 section 09 (Must take a Live, Learn, Lead)

Winter Semester: HNR 280 sections 07 and 08

Schedule (First semester): TR 4:00-5:15pm HON 148

Schedule (Second semester): TR 2:30-3:45pm, 4:00-5:15pm HON 148

Fulfills: US Diversity, WRT 150, SWS, World Perspectives, HST 380, 2 Social Sciences (or 1 SS and 1 History), (Philosophy & Literature for transfers), WRT 150 (w/ B or better), Issues

Karen Zivi, Professor

Richard Hiskes, Professor

 

Urbanism           *THIS COURSE IS CLOSED*

Fall Semester:         HNR 280 21 (Must take a Live, Learn, Lead)

Winter Semester:    HNR 280 sections 15 and 16

Schedule (Fall):    MW 1:30-2:45pm HON 218

Schedule (Winter):   TR 2:30-3:45pm, 4:00-5:15pm EC 510

Fulfills:  History, Art, One Social Science, US Diversity, HST 380, WRT 150 (with a B or better), 1 SWS, 1 Issues

Melissa Morison, Associate Professor of Classics

Matthey Daley, Associate Professor of History