Honors Courses

To jump to specific courses click on the following links:

Art

Science

Social Science

Junior Seminar

Supplementary Courses

 
 

Art Courses

Some Honors students take a Foundational Interdisciplinary sequence that does not fulfill the art requirements. In order to cover this requirement, we offer the following Honors Art Courses

***Detailed class descriptions coming soon.

Fall 2015

HNR 280 20: History of Collecting

Schedule: TR 2:30-3:45pm HON 219

TBA

 

HNR 280 29: SWS Art and Money

Schedule: MW 3:00-4:15pm ASH 2113

Ellen Adams, Professor

 

Winter 2016

HNR 280 19: SWS Modernism

Schedule: MW 1:30-2:45pm HON 148

Ellen Adams, Professor

 

HNR 280 20: SWS Art and Empire

Schedule: TR 2:30-3:45pm HON 219

TBA


Science Courses

Fall 2015, & Winter 2016

Students must complete one Honors Life Science Course (3 credits) and one Honors Physical Science Course (4 credits).

Students majoring in engineering, pre-health curricula, or the sciences may be able to substitute courses within their program for the Honors Sciences.

Computer science majors are required to complete any one of the following
two-course sequences:

CHM 115 and CHM 116  (physical science)
BIO 120 and BIO 121 (life science)
PHY 220 and PHY 221 (physical science)
PHY 230 and PHY 231 (physical science)

Students majoring in computer science must fulfill the other science requirement with an Honors science course.

For example, if a student completes CHM 115 and CHM 116 sequence; the life science requirement needs to be fulfilled through an Honors life science course (HNR 242, 245, or 247).

***Detailed class descriptions coming soon.

Life Science Courses
(One of the following) 3 credits each

HNR 242 01: Plants and People (Fall)

Schedule: TR 6:00-7:15pm HON 214

Requirements Fulfilled: Life Science

Sheila Blackman, Associate Professor of Biology

 

HNR 245 01: Microbes and Society (Fall)

Schedule: MW 3:00-4:15pm HON 214

Requirements Fulfilled: Life Science

Roderick Morgan, Professor 

 

HNR 242 01: Plants and People (Winter)

Schedule: TR 4:00-5:15 HON 214

Requirements Fulfilled: Life Science

Karen Amisi, Adjunct Instructor of Biology

 

HNR 247 01: Molecules of Life (Winter)

Schedule: TR 1:00-2:15pm HON 214

Requirements Fulfilled: Life Science

Debra Burg, Associate Professor of Biomedical Sciences

 

Physical Science Courses

(One of the following, 4 credits each)                        

HNR 241 01: The Earth, a Global View (Fall)

Schedule: MWF 10:00-11:50am HON 214

Requirements Fulfilled: Physical Science and Lab

Greg Wilson, Lab Coordinator and Professor

 

HNR 246 10 and 901: Chemistry in Perspective (Fall)

Schedule: MW 1:00-2:50pm HON 214

Requirements Fulfilled: Physical Science and Lab

Edward Baum, Professor of Chemistry

 

HNR 241 01: The Earth, a Global View (Winter)

Schedule: MWF 10:00-11:50am HON 214

Requirements Fulfilled: Physical Science and Lab

Greg Wilson, Lab Coordinator

 

HNR 246 10 and 901: Chemistry in Perspective (Winter)

Schedule: MW 1:00-2:50pm HON 214

Requirements Fulfilled: Physical Science and Lab

Edward Baum, Professor of Chemistry

Gordon Alderink, Associate Professor of Health Professions

 

-----OR------

Complete the following sequence to fulfill both life and physical science requirements (Students must take these courses consecutively):

HNR 243 10 and 101: The Human Body in Motion I (Fall)

Schedule: TR 1:00-2:15 and 2:30-3:45pm HON 214

Requirements Fulfilled: Physical Science and Lab

Brad Ambrose, Associate Professor of Physics

 

HNR 244 01: The Human Body in Motion II

Schedule: TR 2:30-3:45 HON 214

Requirements Fulfilled: Life Science

Bradley Ambrose, Professor


Social Science Courses

Social science courses in sociology and psychology study human behavior and culture. They are concerned with the development of principles that explain individual thought, action, and experience; the interactions between people in the context of small groups, communities, institutions, states, and societies; and the functioning of social systems.

PLEASE NOTE: Because the economics courses are from one discipline, only one economics course fulfills one social science requirement. Students need to take one more Honors social science course.

***Detailed class descriptions coming soon.

***More class options coming soon.

 

FALL 2015

ECO 210 13: Introductory Macroeconomics (Honors Section)

Schedule: MW 1:30-2:45pm EC 515

Leslie Muller, Assistant Professor

 

ECO 211 06: Introductory Microeconomics (Honors Section)

Schedule: TR 11:30-12:45pm HON 148

Aaron Lowen, Associate Professor

 

HNR 280 25: Race, Culture, & Society

Schedule: MWF 10:00-10:50am HON 219

Requirements Fulfilled: US Diversity

Jennifer Stewart, Professor

 

HNR 231 01: SWS The Holocaust

Schedule: MWF 9:00-9:50am HON 220

Requirements Fulfilled: Social Science

Jason Crouthamel, Professor

 

HNR 231 02: SWS The Holocaust

Schedule: MW 4:30-5:45pm LHH 101

Requirements Fulfilled: Social Science

Robert Franciosi

 

WINTER 2016

ECO 210 08: Introductory Macroeconomics (Honors Section)

Schedule: TR 1:00-2:15pm HON 218

Gerry Simons, Professor

 

ECO 211 04: Introductory Microeconomics (Honors Section)

Schedule: TR 10:00-11:15pm SCB 2020

Kevin Callison, Associate Professor of Economics

 

HNR 231 01: SWS The Holocaust

Schedule: MWF 9:00-9:50am HON 220

Jason Crouthamel, Professor

 

HNR 235 01: SWS Democracy and Political Thinking

Schedule: MW 4:30-5:45pm HON 148

TBA


Junior Seminar

Junior seminars are typically taken during junior year. This will give you an opportunity to learn more in your major, so you can bring your experience and knowledge to the junior seminar.

The topics vary from semester to semester, but junior seminars are opportunities to look in-depth at a topic, issue, or problem, often in ways that allow a student to view the subject through the lens of her or his own major, and to see how students in other majors provide different perspectives on the same subject.

***Detailed class descriptions coming soon.

 

Fall 2015

HNR 311 01: SWS Spirituality and Health

Schedule: TR 8:30-9:45am HON 218

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and World Perspectives

Heather Wallace

 

HNR 312 01: SWS Literary Explorations of Medical Controversies

Schedule: TR 2:30- 3:45pm HON 214

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and U.S. Diversity

Jane Toot, Professor of Physical Therapy

 

HNR 312 02: SWS Literary Explorations of Medical Controversies

Schedule: T 6:00-8:50pm HON 219

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and U.S. Diversity

Gordon Alderink, Associate Professor of Health Professions

 

HNR 312 03: SWS Sociology of Consumption

Schedule: TR 1:00-2:15pm HON 219

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and US Diversity

Joel Stillerman, Professor

 

HNR 312 04: SWS Theory of Human Rights

Schedule: TR 10:00-11:15am HON 214

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and US Diversity

Richard Hiskes, Professor

 

HNR 312 05: SWS Music, Culture, and Aesthetics

Schedule: TR 1:00-2:15pm HON 219

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and US Diversity

Kurt Ellenberger, Professor

 

HNR 312 06: SWS Sex, Power, and Politics

Schedule: TR 11:30-12:45pm HON 236E

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and US Diversity

Karen Zivi, Assistant Professor

 

HNR 312 07: SWS Literary Explorations of Medical Controversies

Schedule: Arranged, Online

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and U.S. Diversity

Susan Swartzlander, Professor of English

 

HNR 313 01: SWS Stoicism and Identity

Schedule: MWF 1:00-1:50pm ASH 2120

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar

Peter Anderson, Professor of Classics

 

HNR 313 02: SWS Social Improvement Through Community Engagement

Schedule: M 3:00-5:50pm HON 148

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar

TBA

 

HNR 313 03: SWS Global Petroleum Geosystems

Schedule: TR 4:00-5:15pm HON PAD 110

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar

John Weber, Professor 

This course explores, from a global perspective, the quickly changing geologic, economic,

political, environmental, and human rights related aspects of petroleum (hydrocarbon; oil and

gas) formation, accumulation, and extraction.  We do this through weekly readings,

discussions, lectures, guest lectures, field trips, exercises, and class projects.  We will explore

questions like: Who, globally, has the most significant oils and gas deposits and why?  How

much oil and gas do we use and from where does it come?  What does this mean for the USA

as a nation, and for us as part of the global community? Why does the price of oil fluctuate so

widely? What is hydrofracking? What is non-conventional about shale oil and gas, and can they

"save" us from peak oil?  Is global warming real and related to energy use?  What does history

tell us about energy use, e.g. are energy wars real?  Finally, where should we head in terms of

a sensible energy policy?   

 

Winter 2016

HNR 311 01: Problem Solving for Sustainable Solutions through System Analysis 

Schedule: TR 1:00 -2:15pm HON 236E

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and World Perspective

Jane Toot, Professor of Physical Therapy

 

HNR 311 03: SWS Scandalous Literature

Schedule: MW 6:00-7:15pm HON 219

David Eick, Professor

 

HNR 312 01: SWS Music, Culture and Aesthetics

Schedule: MW 1:30-2:45pm HON 218

Kurt Ellenberger, Associate Professor of Music

 

HNR 312 02: Literary Explorations of Medical Controversies

Schedule: TR 2:30-3:45pm HON 236E

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and U.S. Diversity

Jane Toot, Professor of Physical Therapy

 

HNR 312 03: Literary Explorations of Medical Controversies 

Schedule: TR 8:30- 9:45pm HON 219

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, U.S. Diversity, and SWS

Gordon Alderink, Associate Professor of Health Professions
 

HNR 312 04: Sixties Youth Culture

Schedule: T 6:00-8:50pm HON 219

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar

Steve Tripp, Professor

 

HNR 312 05: SWS The Terror of Monotheism

Schedule: MW 3:00-4:15pm HON 148

Jeremiah Cataldo, Professor

 

HNR 313 01: SWS Lost Generation

Schedule: Online

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar

Sue Swartzlander, Professor of English

 

HNR 313 02: SWS Cosmology of Poets

Schedule: TR 11:30am-12:45pm HON 214

Edward Baum, Professor of Chemistry

The course explores humankind's current understanding of the nature of the universe and

surveys the links between the fundamental scientific, philosophical, and religious issues in

cosmology, past and present.  It reviews human efforts, from earliest to most recent, to

understand the origin, nature, and fate of the universe.  We investigate primitive cosmogonies

as described in the Rig Veda, Prose Edda, and other ancient documents.  Greek and Arab

debate over philosophical issues concerning the universe's existence are studied.  The

theological and mystical concerns of Christian and Islamic scholars in the Middle Ages are

discussed.  Finally, we explore how the Hubble telescope and other powerful scientific

instruments have given the world community an unprecedented view of the cosmos and the

ability to test cosmological theories, converting cosmology into a scientific endeavor.

 

 

HNR 313 03: SWS Designing Social Ventures

Schedule: MW 4:30-5:45pm HON 214

TBA

 

HNR 313 04: SWS Religion & Science of Origins

Schedule: MW 3:00-4:15pm HON 214

Kelly Clark, Professor 

Primitive peoples, requiring an explanation for thunder, postulated Zeus or Hadad; Aeolus or

Vayu were thought to control the winds, while Tialoc or Chiuta brought on the rain. There was

no end of alleged deities in charge of reproductive success: Famian, Njambi, Ruhanga,

Xesiovo, Ison, and Unkulunkulu, to name just a few. Aristotle called upon the Unmoved Mover

to do some heavy planetary lifting. Are the gods scientific hypotheses that stand or fall by how

well they explain the data? With the development of the reproductive sciences, meteorology,

the principle of inertia, and the law of gravity, these explanatory gods have fallen by the

intellectual wayside. Is religion in battle, a battle it is destined to lose, with other scientific

theories concerning the origins of this or that? We will examine the claims of the Abrahamic

traditions about the origins of the world and life and the relationships of such claims to scientific

theories on the origin of the universe, life, humans, morality, and even the gods themselves.

Using historical and contemporary texts (including the new and exciting, Religioncosm and the

Sciences of Origins (Palgrave-Macmillan)), films and a variety of active learning techniques, we

will work together toward a deeper understanding of both religion and science and their mutual

interrelationships.


Supplementary Honors Courses

These are recommended courses for students in the Seidman College of Business.

FALL 2015

ACC 212 11: Principles of Financial Accounting (Honors Section)

Schedule: TR 11:30am-12:45pm HON 219

Requirements Fulfilled:  Elective

Cheryl Dunn, Professor

 

WINTER 2016

ACC 213 09: Principles of Managerial Accounting (Honors Section)

Schedule: TR 11:30am-12:45pm HON 220

Requirements Fulfilled:  Elective

Anne Sergeant