Honors Curriculum Courses

Art Courses

Some Honors students take a Foundational Interdisciplinary sequence that does not fulfill the art requirements. In order to cover this requirement, we offer the following Honors Art Courses

Fall 2014

HNR 280 20: History of Collecting

Schedule: TR 2:30-3:45pm HON 219

Requirements Fulfilled: Honors Art

Eric Gollannek, Professor

From the British Museum’s History of the World in 100 Objects to the Antiques Roadshow, artifacts and collections offer exciting ways to engage viewers with the past. What stories can we tell through artifacts and how have different collectors thought about objects over time? This course explores the history, theories, and practices of collecting focused on the cabinet of curiosity, art gallery, and public museum from the ancient world through to the present day.  Hands on opportunities include fieldtrips to work with collections at GVSU as well as institutions such as the Grand Rapids Public Museum, Frederik Meijer Gardens, and Muskegon Museum of Art.

 

HNR 280 29: SWS Art and Money

Schedule: MW 3:00-4:15pm CAC 1311

Ellen Adams, Professor

November 2013: Over the course of two evenings—a mere four hours total—New York auction houses Christie’s and Sotheby’s sold over one billion dollars’ worth of contemporary art. The sales smashed records for both living and dead artists, with hedge funders, “international trade” groups, and art dealers furiously bidding up lot after lot. Long-time art world observers proclaimed, in apocalyptic terms, the end of art for the public (museums were conspicuously missing among the buyers). Yet the sales represent the logical culmination of market forces brought to bear on the buying and selling of works of art.

These same forces are not recent developments, and this class will trace the convergence of art and money from its historical origins to the present day world of galleries, art fairs, and auctions. Focusing primarily on the 19th through the 21st centuries, we will study the production, sale, and exchange of works of art as well as the patrons, artists, and collectors who participate in this economic, social, and political form of taste-making and aesthetic valuation. Topics will include philanthropy, both local and national; public funding for art; fakes, fraud, and forgeries; museums and collecting; and the development of an international market for art.

 

Winter 2015

HNR 280 20: Art and Empire

Schedule: TR 2:30-3:45pm HON 219
Requirements Fulfilled: Honors Art, World Perspectives, SWS

Eric Gollannek, Professor

The notion of ‘empire’ readily calls to mind thoughts of Imperial Rome and the British Raj.  In the struggle to make sense of the new millennium, in a post-9/11 age of globalization, the term gained renewed currency as a way to understand the uneasy blend of cultural, political, military and economic power.  This course explores the meaning of empire from the ancient world to the present day through attention to art, architecture, film, and music.  Through critical readings and careful looking, we will examine how culture not only reflects imperial ambition and the power of central authority, but how art itself shaped such desires, testing the ideas of British artist William Blake who said, “Empire follows art and not vice versa as Englishmen suppose.”

 

HNR 280 19: Modernism

Schedule: MW 1:30- 2:45pm HON 148
Requirements Fulfilled: Honors Art, SWS

Ellen Adams, Professor

This course addresses some of the significant movements and developments in art, literature, theater, and thought between 1860 and 1960. This period witnessed a radical expansion in the definition of artistic, literary, and other cultural practices as well as a search for new modes of expression.  Debates in Europe and the United States will be discussed in relation to a historical framework of cultural changes brought about by capitalism, industrialization, war and revolution. We will consider the various meanings of modernism and will discuss a wide range of related issues, including the relationship between “high art” and mass culture; representations of sexual and racial identity; the social and political functions of cultural spaces and commentary; the evolving relationship between modern culture and its audience; and the concept of an avant-garde. Analysis of individual works of art, literature, film, music, and primary texts forms the basis of the course.


Science Courses

Fall 2014, & Winter 2015

Students must complete one Honors Life Science Course (3 credits) and one Honors Physical Science Course (4 credits).

Students majoring in engineering, pre-health curricula, or the sciences may be able to substitute courses within their program for the Honors Sciences.

Computer science majors are required to complete any one of the following
two-course sequences:

CHM 115 and CHM 116  (physical science)
BIO 120 and BIO 121 (life science)
PHY 220 and PHY 221 (physical science)
PHY 230 and PHY 231 (physical science)

Students majoring in computer science must fulfill the other science requirement with an Honors science course.

For example, if a student completes CHM 115 and CHM 116 sequence; the life science requirement needs to be fulfilled through an Honors life science course (HNR 242, 245, or 247).

 

Life Science Courses
(one of the following) 3 credits each

HNR 242 01: Plants and People (Fall)
Schedule: TR 6:00-7:15pm HON 214
Requirements Fulfilled: Life Science
Sheila Blackman, Associate Professor of Biology

Plants are the dominant organisms on the landscape and are often taken for granted. The ecology, structure, function, genetics, and variety of plants are studied in order to develop an appreciation of the dependence of humans upon them for food, oxygen, shelter, medicines, and pleasure.

 

HNR 245 01: Microbes and Society (Fall)
Schedule: MW 3:00-4:15pm HON 214
Requirements Fulfilled: Life Science
Roderick Morgan, Professor

This course addresses the fundamental nature of microorganisms, how microorganisms make us sick and how we deal with infections, and the role of microorganisms in global warming. In the course, you will learn how microbes are classified and organized and what makes a microbe infectious or not. The course will also help you understand the many positive aspects of how humans exploit microorganisms in food production, such as yogurt, beer and cheese, medicine production, such as antibiotics, and sewage treatment. We will also discuss how microorganisms have influenced human history including how they have been used in past and current warfare. Since microbes can cause tremendous suffering or provide countless benefits, after taking the course you will appreciate how microorganisms greatly affect our everyday lives.

 

HNR 242 01: Plants and People (Winter)
Schedule: TR 4:00-5:15 HON 214
Requirements Fulfilled: Life Science
Karen Amisi, Adjunct Instructor of Biology

Plants are the dominant organisms on the landscape and are often taken for granted. The ecology, structure, function, genetics, and variety of plants are studied in order to develop an appreciation of the dependence of humans upon them for food, oxygen, shelter, medicines, and pleasure.

 

HNR 247 01: Molecules of Life (Winter)
Schedule: TR 1:00-2:15pm HON 214
Requirements Fulfilled: Life Science
Debra Burg, Associate Professor of Biomedical Sciences

This course is an introduction to basic biological concepts in the context of human health and disease. These concepts will provide the foundation for understanding the interplay between biotechnology and emerging strategies in health care. The impact of biotechnology on the social, economic, cultural, political and ethical aspects of society will be explored.

 

Physical Science Courses

(One of the following, 4 credits each)
                                                                                                                             

HNR 241 01: The Earth, a Global View (Fall and Winter)
Schedule:
MWF 10:00-11:50am HON 214
Requirements Fulfilled: Physical Science and Lab
Greg Wilson, Lab Coordinator and Professor

In this introduction to geology, students will engage in scientific inquiry and develop a sense of discovery of the dynamic nature of Earth’s systems.  We will be investigating the geologic materials that comprise the Earth and the dynamic processes that are ceaselessly changing the shape of the Earth's surface. Through the integration of lecture, lab and field trips we will investigate three major geologic cycles and their related topics - plate tectonics (earthquakes, mountain building, and volcanoes), the rock cycle (minerals and rocks), and the hydrologic cycle (streams, groundwater, and glaciers).  While exploring these major cycles we will examine ways in which the science of geology effects our daily lives.  We will also examine how the ways in which we live can impact upon our environment.

 

HNR 246 10 and 901: Chemistry in Perspective (Fall and Winter)
Schedule: WF 1:00-2:50pm Wednesday: HON 214 Friday: HON 219
Requirements Fulfilled: Physical Science and Lab
Edward Baum, Professor of Chemistry

This is a one-semester course in chemistry for non-science majors in the Honors program.  Concepts in science are taught in the context of major societal issues such as global warming, stratospheric ozone depletion, and energy resources for the future.  A guided-inquiry course, students learn the subject matter and develop essential skills by working in self-managed teams on activities that involve guided discovery, information processing, critical thinking, and problem solving, and that includes reflection on learning and assessment of performance.

 

HNR 246 20 and 902: Chemistry in Perspective (Winter)
Schedule:
M 3:00-4:50pm HON 214 & W 3:00-4:50pm HON 220
Requirements Fulfilled: Physical Science and Lab
Edward Baum, Professor of Chemistry

This is a one-semester course in chemistry for non-science majors in the Honors program.  Concepts in science are taught in the context of major societal issues such as global warming, stratospheric ozone depletion, and energy resources for the future.  A guided-inquiry course, students learn the subject matter and develop essential skills by working in self-managed teams on activities that involve guided discovery, information processing, critical thinking, and problem solving, and that includes reflection on learning and assessment of performance.

 

HNR 280 25 & 26: World Water Issues and Lab (Winter)
Class Schedule:  TR 10:00-11:15am HON 219
Lab Schedule: W 3:00-5:50pm HON 214
Peter Wampler, Professor
Richard Rediske, Professor

This is a one-semester course in world water resources for non-science majors in the Honors program.  This course offers a transdisciplinary exploration of water resources, drinking water supply, and sanitation issues on a global basis with an emphasis on developing strategies for sustainable programs in developing nations. Students will work collaboratively to explore world water issues from geology, biology, public health, economic, and social science perspectives, and develop sustainable intervention strategies.

 

-----OR------

Complete the following sequence to fulfill both life and physical science requirements (Students must take these courses consecutively):

HNR 243 10 and 101: The Human Body in Motion I (Fall)

Schedule: TR 1:00-3:45pm HON 214
Requirements Fulfilled: Physical Science and Lab

Brad Ambrose, Associate Professor of Physics

This course is the first semester in the two-semester sequence fulfilling the General Education requirements in science for Honors students. The structure and function of human movement as well as the nature of science will be examined from biological, chemical, and physical perspectives in order to develop an appreciation for the human body.

 

HNR 244 01: The Human Body in Motion II (Winter)

Schedule: TR 2:30-3:45pm HON 214
Requirements Fulfilled: Life Science

Brad Ambrose, Associate Professor of Physics

“In this second course of a two-course sequence, students continue their study of human performance from biological, chemical, and physical perspectives. Specifically, the students themselves design, develop, and execute independent projects that extend beyond the background material covered in the first course of the sequence. To fulfill part of the course requirements, students complete an academic manuscript and a scholarly oral presentation.”


Social Science Courses

Social science courses in sociology and psychology study human behavior and culture. They are concerned with the development of principles that explain individual thought, action, and experience; the interactions between people in the context of small groups, communities, institutions, states, and societies; and the functioning of social systems.

 

FALL 2014

PLEASE NOTE: Because the economics courses are from one discipline, only one economics course fulfills one social science requirement. Students need to take one more Honors social science course.

ANT 204 10: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (Honors Section)
Schedule: MWF 1:00-1:50pm LSH 229
TBA


*Course description TBA*

 

CJ 405 03: Terrorism (Honors Section)

Schedule: MW 1:30-2:45pm HON 236E
Jonathan White, Professor

Join Zebra 27 and become a terrorism analyst! This is a stand-alone version of the terrorism course in the National Security sequence. Students will participate in a simulated non-profit research company, Zebra 27. We gather and analyze open source intelligence to assist government agencies. (Projects are based on Dr. Jon’s experiences as a counterterrorism contractor with the U.S. government.) This semester Zebra 27 has a contract with the U.S.  Intelligence Community. You will be assigned to one of five teams, and your team will prepare an in-depth briefing on a terrorist group. For example, you might be assigned to conduct a threat analysis on al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula. Your team will request briefings from a subject matter expert, gather information, analyze data, and present a threat analysis at the end of the semester. You’ll also learn techniques of counterterrorism such as hostage rescue or methods of conducting a raid. No lectures. No texts. You decide what you need to learn to complete your threat analysis. It’s just like the real work-a-day world. Want to discover what is going on in the world of Shadow Wars? Join Zebra 27.

 

ECO 211 06: Introductory Microeconomics (Honors Section)
Schedule: TR 11:30am-12:45pm HON 148
Paul Sicilian, Professor

*Course description TBA*

 

HNR 280 25: SWS Race, Culture, & Society
Schedule: MWF  10:00-10:50am HON 219
Requirements Fulfilled: US Diversity
Jennifer Stewart, Professor

Over the course of this semester, we will examine historical and contemporary forms of racism in the US.  We will also study the social construction of race or the process by which laws, language, visual images, education, and structural positioning creates and maintains race and difference.  By examining the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in the US, we will be able to see how race is defined, experienced, and lived.  To make sense of our studies we will be emphasizing the contributions of critical race theorists, new labor historians, and other contemporary sociologists working in the area of Race & Ethnic Studies.
 

HNR 231, 01: SWS The Holocaust
Schedule: MWF 9:00-9:50am HON 220
Requirements Fulfilled: Social Science
Jason Crouthamel, Professor

The fact that this enormous crime occurred in the modern world, in the heart of “civilized” Europe, deeply challenges Western perspectives on traditional institutions, values and thought. How could the culture that produced Beethoven, Bach and Einstein also produce the most barbaric regime in the history of the modern world?  Since 1945, the Western World has struggled to come to terms with the significance of this event. Historian Yehuda Bauer argues that in order to address the philosophical, theological, and psychological implications of the Holocaust, one must first examine the Holocaust as an historical event. This is a central goal of the course. The Holocaust presents not only some of the most difficult intellectual and scholarly questions, but it also challenges us on fundamental psychological, moral, and spiritual levels.  We will study some of the seminal books on the Holocaust by leading historians.  In addition, we will closely analyze eyewitness testimonies of both perpetrators and survivors, whose voices in documentaries like Shoah will serve as a central basis for discussion.
 

HNR 231 02: SWS The Holocaust
Schedule: MW 4:30-5:45pm CON 215
Requirements Fulfilled: Social Science
Robert Franciosi

This course will examine the Holocaust, a “watershed event” that Yehuda Bauer argues represented “something radically new” in history and that changed “human perspective.” Although we will consider the implications of this statement, our primary goal will be to gain a solid understanding of what the Holocaust was. To that end we will concentrate mostly on historical narratives and primary documents, though with our viewing of Claude Lanzmann’s epic documentary film, Shoah, and with our work on the collection How Was it Humanly Possible?, we will also consider the psychological, social, political, historical, cultural, and economic forces that affected the various groups impacted by the destruction of Europe’s Jews—the perpetrators, victims, bystanders, rescuers, and resisters.

SPECIAL EVENTS
In conjunction with an October lecture by Professor Jan Gross of Princeton University, we will read his important book, Neighbors, and also attend his campus presentation.

Students who complete either HNR231 or 331 will be eligible to enroll in the Spring 2015 course, “Remembering the Holocaust,” which will include travel to Germany and Poland.

 

PSY 101 05: Intro Psychology (Honors Section)
Schedule:  MWF 11:00a-11:50a, HON 220
Requirements Fulfilled: Social Science, SWS
Jennifer Gross

Three themes capture our quest into all things psychological.  Despite the breadth and diversity of the field, ranging from the anatomy of the eye, to forms of pathology, to psychology’s insights on user-friendly design, all of Psychology embraces the scientific study of human behavior (Theme 1).  The scientific approach offers the highest standard of evidence, which affords a powerful approach to determine the validity of commonly-made assertions (e.g., “Is watching TV violence really harmless”).  With scientific scrutiny, you can evaluate persuasive dogma.  The study of Psychology reveals how even the simplest human behavior is influenced by a multitude of forces (Theme 2).  This insight about the complexity of behavior fosters avoidance of simplistic, naïve explanations for human actions (like, “there are two kinds of people in the world—the weak and the strong; the good and the evil”).  Nothing about human behavior is this simple.  By scientifically determining answers to questions like: “Can leading questions distort eyewitness memory, is it safe to drive and talk on the phone, can stress increase my susceptibility to colds, and are there really different learning styles,” Psychology has a practical impact on everyday life (Theme 3).

 

HNR 280 30: Human Trafficking and Vis. Thinkers
Schedule: MW 4:30 – 5:45pm, ASH 2320
Requirements Fulfilled: Social science, World Perspectives
Joseph M Verschaeve

The term “human trafficking” often evokes strong feelings, for it implies the minded, organized and patterned subjugation and exploitation of vulnerable persons for profit. Trafficking occurs in West Michigan as well as around the world. Current global estimates of slavery exceed thirty million people living in the underground world of labor and sex trafficking.  This course examines the trafficking of persons across particular geographic regions where slavery occurs. The breadth and depth of the problem will be explored and analyzed across disciplines from macro to the micro units of analysis. The life and work of Ghanaian human rights leader and visionary, James Kofi Annan, is featured throughout the course. Particular focus of this course involves detection, intervention, and prevention of the trafficking in persons. Many approaches of inquest are taken including but not limited to: micro and macroeconomics, geography, political science, public policy, sociology, anthropology, psychology, law, medicine, education. Throughout the course students will interact with leaders in the fight against trafficking. Student are required to provide six hours of service to an anti-trafficking or human rights organization.
 

 

WINTER 2015

ANT 204 10: Cultural Anthropology (Honors Section)
Schedule: MW 3:00-4:15pm LMH 253
TBA
 

*Course description TBA*

 

ECO 210 06: Introductory Macroeconomics (Honors Section)
Schedule: TR 1:00-2:15pm HON 218
Leslie Muller

*Course description TBA*

 

ECO 211 06: Introductory Microeconomics (Honors Section)
Schedule: MW 1:30-2:45pm EC 515
Aaron Lowen

Focuses on the interactions among households, producers, and governments in market economies. Applies fundamental methods of economic analysis to topics such as consumer decision-making and welfare; producer pricing, profits, and organization; wages and income distribution; global poverty; health care and insurance; and government taxes, spending, and regulation of markets.

 

HNR 231 01: SWS The Holocaust
Schedule: MWF 9:00-9:50am HON 220
Jason Crouthamel, Professor

The fact that this enormous crime occurred in the modern world, in the heart of “civilized” Europe, deeply challenges Western perspectives on traditional institutions, values and thought. How could the culture that produced Beethoven, Bach and Einstein also produce the most barbaric regime in the history of the modern world?  Since 1945, the Western World has struggled to come to terms with the significance of this event. Historian Yehuda Bauer argues that in order to address the philosophical, theological, and psychological implications of the Holocaust, one must first examine the Holocaust as an historical event. This is a central goal of the course. The Holocaust presents not only some of the most difficult intellectual and scholarly questions, but it also challenges us on fundamental psychological, moral, and spiritual levels.  We will study some of the seminal books on the Holocaust by leading historians.  In addition, we will closely analyze eyewitness testimonies of both perpetrators and survivors, whose voices in documentaries like Shoah will serve as a central basis for discussion.

 

HNR 235 01: SWS Democracy and Political Thinking
Schedule: MW 4:30-5:45pm HON 148
Richard Hiskes

This course is an introduction to normative political thinking – reasoning about what politics ought to be.  The course stresses your participation in thinking deeply about some of the fundamental questions of public life, including who should rule, the nature and scope of our political obligations, and the demands of political justice.  The argument of this course is that sound political reasoning is a precondition of good citizenship in a democracy.


Junior Seminar

Junior seminars are typically taken during junior year. This will give you an opportunity to learn more in your major, so you can bring your experience and knowledge to the junior seminar.

The topics vary from semester to semester, but junior seminars are opportunities to look in-depth at a topic, issue, or problem, often in ways that allow a student to view the subject through the lens of her or his own major, and to see how students in other majors provide different perspectives on the same subject.

 

Fall 2014

HNR 300 01: SWS Classical Mythology
Schedule: MW 3:00-4:15pm HON 220
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and World Perspectives
Sufen Lai, Professor

 

HNR 300 studies the values, functions, transformations, and meanings of ancient Greek and Roman myths in their cultural and historical contexts. The world of the Greco-Roman myths will be compared and contrasted with ancient Mesopotamia with a variety of methods of interpreting myths being explored. Students are expected to develop a cross-cultural understanding and appreciation of myths through comparative approach. The content of this course is not exclusively "western" or "ancient." The Cry for Myth written by well-known existential psychologist, Rollo May, will help us make connections between ancient myths and the modern world we live in. Readings include myths continuing to influence modern literature and thought, such as the Homeric hymns, Hesiod's Theogony, Ovid's Metamorphoses, Babylonian Creation, and the Epic of Gilgamesh. (Fall 2005) Fulfills World Perspectives requirement.

 

HNR 312 01: SWS Literary Explorations of Medical Controversies
Schedule: TR 10:00- 11:15am HON 214
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and U.S. Diversity
Jane Toot, Professor of Physical Therapy

This junior seminar focuses on ethical, cultural, and controversial issues in medicine today. Through fiction, poetry, memoirs, film, and essays, we learn not only about people’s experiences with illness, but also how cultural differences shape our interactions with the healthcare system. Our analysis of texts elucidates attitudes toward race, ethnicity, gender, age, disability, and sexual orientation, which have been implicit in “objective” medical science from the Victorian period through our contemporary experience. Topics include research/experimentation, aging, women’s health issues, AIDS, depression, cancer, and end of life concerns. Students are encouraged to use course assignments to explore their own areas of specific interest.

 

HNR 312 02: SWS Literary Explorations of Medical Controversies
Schedule: ONLINE
Requirements Fulfilled:
Junior Seminar and U.S. Diversity
Sue Swartzlander, Professor of English

This junior seminar focuses on ethical, cultural, and controversial issues in medicine today. Through fiction, poetry, memoirs, film, and essays, we learn not only about people’s experiences with illness, but also how cultural differences shape our interactions with the healthcare system. Our analysis of texts elucidates attitudes toward race, ethnicity, gender, age, disability, and sexual orientation, which have been implicit in “objective” medical science from the Victorian period through our contemporary experience. Topics include research/experimentation, aging, women’s health issues, AIDS, depression, cancer, and end of life concerns. Students are encouraged to use course assignments to explore their own areas of specific interest.


HNR 312 03: SWS Sociology of Consumption
Schedule: TR 1:00-2:15pm HON 148
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and US Diversity
Joel Stillerman, Professor

Consumption – the desire for, purchase, use, exchange, and disposal of products and services – is an essential feature of our everyday lives, yet we seldom examine its meaning and importance.  Why do we want certain products?  How are our desires shaped by advertising, marketing, and market research? How do our tastes reflect the class, gender, racial, and age groups to which we belong?  In this course, students will have the opportunity to explore these questions by reading key theoretical perspectives on the nature and meaning of consumption as well as recent research on consumer culture in the U.S. Readings have a specific focus on how consumer behavior and consumer culture both reflect and help reinforce social inequalities based on class, race, gender and age.  Significant themes include the role of advertising and promotion in consumption and culture, how historical legacies of racial inequality affect the patterns of consumption across ethnic/racial groups, the symbolic and ritual aspects of consumption, the ethics of consumption, the relationship between consumption and social roles/identities (gender, age, race), and the intersection of consumption/ sales practices with personal relationships.  Classes combine lectures, discussions, group activities, and audiovisual materials.  Assignments include research exercises on consumer behavior and reflective journals on students’ consumption practices. 

 

HNR 312 04: SWS Theory of Human Rights
Schedule: MW 4:30-5:45pm HON 220
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and US Diversity
Richard Hiskes

Explores the historical and philosophical development of the theory of human rights and, in the second half of the term applies theoretical approaches to significant human rights issues such as trafficking, genocide, and the rights of minority populations.  Among other objectives, students will learn to appreciate different philosophical schools of thought regarding the reality of rights and their applicability to contemporary issues and construct written and oral arguments exploring the relevance and usefulness of applying human rights concepts to contemporary political, international, and ethical issues and problems.

 

HNR 312 05: SWS Music, Culture, and Aesthetics
Schedule:
TR 1:00-2:15pm HON 218
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and US Diversity
Kurt Ellenberger, Professor

This course will examine music as it intersects with and helps define culture in present-day America (where culturally-diverse genres coexist and cross-pollinate in a surprising manner), and contrast this with similar developments during pivotal points in the last 500 years. We will look at “art music” and popular music in many of their forms and examine them through readings from scholarly and popular writings. Aesthetics will function as a means of identifying embedded cultural values that transcend genre, thus illuminating our understanding of music in a broader societal context.

 

HNR 313 01; SWS Stoicism and Identity
Schedule:
W 6:00-9:50pm HON 219

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar
Peter Anderson, Professor of Classics

*Course description TBA*

 

HNR 313 02: SWS Social Improvement Through Community Engagement
Schedule: MWF 9:00-9:50am HON 219
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar
Bill Holsinger-Robinson

Ever wonder how events like TEDxGrandRapids (www.tedxgrandrapids.org) come about? Where did the idea come from? How was the team pulled together and organized? How are events like this led, funded and gain community support? In this course you will learn some fundamental frameworks for starting and running your own organizations through hands on experiences working with the TEDxGrandRapids team. You will also gain exposure to other events/projects (both significant and start-up) that are happening in Grand Rapids.

Specifically, we will work to:

  • Develop your ideas
  • Create a sense of purpose and vision
  • Build and organize teams
  • Measure your impact
  • Start small through prototyping

The basics on what you can expect to learn:

  • How to build and organize teams.
  • How to run an effective meeting.
  • How to gain community support.
  • How to position yourself and your project to raise funding.
  • How to think about partnerships with other community organizations and businesses.


HNR 313 05: SWS Visionary Thinkers: Marx
Schedule: TR 6:00-8:50pm HON 219
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar
Gordon Alderink, Professor

For most, the fall of the Berlin Wall signaled the triumph of a “free market” (capitalism) over central planning (communism), democracy over totalitarianism.  However, the Great Recession of 2008 suggests that the neo-liberal model of capitalism is not what it “appears”; explanations for the recession superficially credit de-regulation and greed as the primary faults.  Karl Marx’s research and scholarship in the middle 19th century, contrasted, what he called, the “appearance” with the “essence” of capitalism, which may provide more profound clues to our most recent economic crisis.  In this course students will: 1) explore the life of Karl Marx as a backdrop to reading Capital (Volume 1) and 2) pursue a critical reading and analysis of Capital.

 

Winter 2015

HNR 311 01: SWS Problem Solving for Sustainable Solutions through System Analysis
Schedule:
TR 1:00 -2:15pm HON 236E
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and World Perspective
Jane Toot, Professor of Physical Therapy

This course will examine a variety of problem solving techniques which can be used across disciplines and which support a sustainable approach to seeking solutions. The range of professions will included business, education, health care, and politics. Participants will learn how to identify, use and develop isomorphic strategies and tools to address presented problems.

 

HNR 311 02: SWS The European Union
Schedule:
TR 11:30 am– 12:45 pm  LSH 227
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and World Perspective
John Constantelos, Professor of Political Science

An examination of the history, economics, politics, and policies of the European Union and its twenty-eight member states.  Topics include the euro crisis, EU-US relations, EU enlargement, immigration issues, and economic, social, environmental, and security policies.  In April, students will participate in the Midwest Model EU, an intercollegiate simulation that meets for three days on the campus of Indiana University, in Bloomington, IN.

 

HNR 311 03: SWS Survey of French Literature II, "Scandalous Literature"
Schedule: MW 6:00-7:15pm HON 219
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and World Perspectives
David Eick, Professor

Readers aghast, books publicly lacerated and burned by the executioner, authors and publishers threatened with the death penalty for sedition and irreligion--many masterpieces of Old Regime French literature sparked heated controversy when they were first published. This course focuses on texts originally deemed offensive or dangerous for their experimentations with linguistic and literary conventions, exploration of new modes of feeling, questioning of religious and political orthodoxy, and representations of desire. Four weeks will be devoted to a Reacting to the Past game, “The Enlightenment in Crisis: Diderot’s Encyclopédie in a Parisian Salon.”

 

HNR 311 04: SWS Biotechnology & the World
Schedule: TR 10:00-11:15am LSH 136
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and World Perspectives
Osman Patel, Assistant Professor of Cell and Molecular Biology

Biotechnology has been practiced by human society since the beginning of civilization. However, the discovery of the structure of DNA and the function of cells has advanced biotechnology to unprecedented levels. Twenty-first century biotechnology, armed with genetic engineering and the deciphered codes of life (genomes), is affecting every facet of human existence and has brought about radical changes in technological approaches to the world’s problems of food, health, global warming, energy production and environment.  The purpose of this course is to examine the evolution of biotechnology paralleled with the economic and societal dilemmas created around the world by the advances in biotechnology.

 

HNR 312 01: SWS Hollywood & the Holocaust
Schedule: MW 3:00-4:15 HON 236E
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, U.S. Diversity, Philosophy & Literature, and SWS
Robert Franciosi, Professor

For most Americans the Holocaust’s enormity only became evident in the spring of 1945, when celebratory images of Nazi Germany’s defeat were accompanied by horrific footage from the liberated concentration camps. What has been termed “American Holocaust consciousness” was first prompted, then, and continues to be renewed, by our national passion for moving images—on the screen, the tube, or the LCD display. This course will trace America’s evolving understanding of the Holocaust by considering the way films and television programs, two pillars of our mass culture, have shaped that knowledge for millions of Americans. Organized chronologically, the seminar will examine how particular American works have reflected or prompted Holocaust awareness. Students will also set those understandings within the larger cultural dynamic of American society between 1945 and the present.

Structure
This seminar will adopt a structure common to many GVSU science courses—two hours of lecture/discussion, complemented with three hours of lab, i.e., film viewing. Class will meet on MW for fifty minutes, but also gather on Thursday nights for three hours to screen films. Because of this significant time commitment, course reading requirements will be less than in a typical junior seminar, though the writing expectations will remain at the SWS level.

 

HNR 312 02: SWS Literary Explorations of Medical Controversies
Schedule:
TR 2:30-3:45pm HON 236E
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and U.S. Diversity
Jane Toot, Professor of Physical Therapy

This junior seminar focuses on ethical, cultural, and controversial issues in medicine today. Through fiction, poetry, memoirs, film, and essays, we learn not only about people’s experiences with illness, but also how cultural differences shape our interactions with the healthcare system. Our analysis of texts elucidates attitudes toward race, ethnicity, gender, age, disability, and sexual orientation, which have been implicit in “objective” medical science from the Victorian period through our contemporary experience. Topics include research/experimentation, aging, women’s health issues, AIDS, depression, cancer, and end of life concerns. Students are encouraged to use course assignments to explore their own areas of specific interest.

 

HNR 312 03: SWS Literary Explorations of Medical Controversies
Schedule: TR 8:30- 9:45pm HON 219
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, U.S. Diversity, and SWS
Gordon Alderink, Associate Professor of Health Professions

This junior seminar focuses on ethical, cultural, and controversial issues in medicine today. Through fiction, poetry, memoirs, film, and essays, we learn not only about people’s experiences with illness, but also how cultural differences shape our interactions with the healthcare system. Our analysis of texts elucidates attitudes toward race, ethnicity, gender, age, disability, and sexual orientation, which have been implicit in “objective” medical science from the Victorian period through our contemporary experience. Topics include research/experimentation, aging, women’s health issues, AIDS, depression, cancer, and end of life concerns. Students are encouraged to use course assignments to explore their own areas of specific interest.

 

HNR 312 04: SWS Sex, Power and Politics
Schedule: TR 11:30am-12:45pm HON 236E
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and US Diversity
Karen Zivi, Assistant Professor of Political Science

This course looks at the way theories of sexuality (understood broadly to include gender and sexual difference) inform the policies and practices that shape the lives of everyday citizens. It pays particular attention to the ways that understandings of sexual difference can reinforce the inequality and subordination of certain individuals and it explores possibilities for making change.

This interdisciplinary seminar-style course brings the writings of feminist, political, and social theorists together with analyses of contemporary public policy controversies. Student will be encouraged to consider questions such as: Are men and women born or made? What role does biology play in shaping whom we are and how we live? What role does the state or tradition play? What difference does or should “sexual difference” make anyway? And what role should the individual, the state, or society play in making it possible for individuals to flourish?  While emphasis will be placed on understanding the theoretical underpinnings and political implications of these questions, attention will also be given to the way they play out in contemporary debates about the roles of women in and outside of the home, changing norms of masculinity, the meaning and scope of reproductive freedom, the value or danger of pornography, and the ongoing struggle for LGBT equality.

 


HNR 312 05: SWS The Terror of Monotheism
Schedule:
MW 3:00-4:15pm HON 148

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and US Diversity
Jeremiah Cataldo, Professor

This course analyzes the ideological and material formation of monotheistic religious identities, historical and modern, and how those identities restrict forms or types of social engagement with the surrounding world. It starts with this basic hypothesis: monotheism, in its different forms, is a product of a contest for authority that begins in the material world.

 

HNR 313 01: SWS Lost Generation
Schedule: Online
Requirements Fulfilled:
Junior Seminar
Sue Swartzlander, Professor of English

"It was a place where the very air was impregnated with the energies of art."
- Thomas Wolfe
"Was it fun in Paris? Who did you see there and was the Madeleine pink at five o'clock and did the fountains fall with hollow delicacy into the framing of space in the Place de la Concorde and did the blue creep out from behind the Colonades of the Rue de Rivoli through the grill of the Tuileries and was the Louvre gray and metallic in the sun and did the trees hang brooding over the cafes and were there lights at night and the click of saucers and the auto horns that play DeBussy-I love Paris. How was it?"
-Zelda Fitzgerald
"If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris . . . then wherever you go for the rest of your life, it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast."
-Ernest Hemingway
If you were a writer, artist, or musician in the roaring 20's, Paris was *THE* place to be. Sign on for a journey back in time to a magical city that inspired such creative geniuses as James Joyce, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Andre Breton, Jean Cocteau, ee cummings, Gertrude Stein, Man Ray, Igor Stravinsky, Pablo Picasso, Sergei Eisenstein,  Josephine Baker, and Isadora Duncan. We will read a variety of literary texts and "little magazines", view contemporary photographs, paintings, and films, and listen to music of the jazz age.
If you have an interest in modern literature, music, art, dance, film, photography, literary cafes, or the roaring twenties, this is the junior seminar for you. So, don't be a flat tire, be a darb and learn more about this ritzy time in this swanky city. Twenty-three skiddoo now to sign up for this whoppee that will be not only the bee's knees but the cat's meow as well!

 

HNR 313 02: SWS Religion and Science of Origins
Schedule:
TR 11:30am-12:45pm HON 220

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar
Kelly Clark, Professor

Primitive peoples, requiring an explanation for thunder, postulated Zeus or Hadad; Aeolus or Vayu were thought to control the winds, while Tialoc or Chiuta brought on the rain. There was no end of alleged deities in charge of reproductive success: Famian, Njambi, Ruhanga, Xesiovo, Ison, and Unkulunkulu, to name just a few. The great Aristotle called upon the Unmoved Mover to do some heavy planetary lifting. Are the gods scientific hypotheses that stand or fall by how well they explain the data? With the development of the reproductive sciences, meteorology, the principle of inertia, and the law of gravity, these explanatory gods have fallen by the intellectual wayside. Is religion in a battle with other scientific theories concerning, most fundamentally, the origins of this or that? If so, is religion destined to lose its battle with science as science explains this and that? We will examine the claims of the Abrahamic traditions about the origins of the world and life and the relationships of such claims to scientific theories on the origin of the universe, life, humans, morality, and even the gods themselves.


HNR 313 03: SWS Designing Social Ventures
Schedule:
MWF 9:00-9:50am HON 219
William Holsinger-Robinson

*Course description TBA*


Other Honors Courses

These are recommended courses for students in the Seidman College of Business.

FALL 2014

ACC 212 12: Principles of Financial Accounting (Honors Section)
Schedule:
TR 11:30am-12:45pm HON 214
Cheryl Dunn, Professor
 

Students in this course are given the tools needed to develop the ability to prepare, analyze, and interpret accounting information. Basic accounting concepts will be applied to facilitate understanding of the relationship between business activities and accounting information.  Students will develop problem solving, critical thinking, and communication skills necessary to use accounting information, form conclusions about business activities, and communicate those conclusions to others.  Accounting majors and minors who complete both Accounting 212 honors and Accounting 213 honors will be permitted to waive Accounting 240.

 

BUS 201 11: Legal Environment for Business
Schedule: TR 1:00-2:15pm EC 316
Star Swift

The legal, regulatory, and ethical environment in which business operates is explored, with emphasis on the regulation of business, international law, environmental law, ethics, the political and social factors influencing case and statutory law, contracts, employment law, and business organizations.

 

WINTER 2015

ACC 213 07: Principles of Managerial Accounting (Honors Section)
Schedule: TR 11:30am-12:45pm HON 214
Anne Sergeant

This course examines the use of accounting information for planning, control and decision-making in business.  Topics include product costing, cost behavior analysis, activity-based costing, budgeting, variance analysis, performance measures in a decentralized organization, pricing, relevant costs for decision-making and careers in accounting.  The course will provide students the opportunity to use accounting information to solve business problems. Accounting majors and minors who complete both Accounting 212 honors and Accounting 213 honors will be permitted to waive Accounting 240. 

 

STA 215 52: Introductory Applied Statistics (Honors Section)
Schedule: M 10:00-10:50am MAK D2233, W 10:00-10:50am MAK A2111, F 10:00-10:50am MAK A2103
TBA

*Course description TBA*