Junior Seminar

Junior seminars are typically taken during junior year. This will give you an opportunity to learn more in your major, so you can bring your experience and knowledge to the junior seminar.
The topics vary from semester to semester, but junior seminars are opportunities to look in-depth at a topic, issue, or problem, often in ways that allow a student to view the subject through the lens of her or his own major, and to see how students in other majors provide different perspectives on the same subject.

Spring/Summer 2013

HNR 311 01: Anthropology of the Middle East

Schedule: TR 8:30-11:50
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, World Perspectives, and SWS

Sebastian Maisel, Assistant Professor for Arabic and Middle East Studies

As one of the regional cultures courses in anthropology, this course provides an ethnographic and ethnological survey of Middle Eastern and North African peoples and culture. It highlights the social and cultural change of communities as well as the resistance to change in the period since the First World War, which redrew the map to serve the needs of European nations, but it also gives an in-depth look at traditional culture and society. The effect of the colonial period upon socio-cultural development is examined through a variety of literature and field notes. The general focus is on issues of identity, majority-minority relations, self-representation and the perception of the other. Relations between humans and environment, between cultures, and within societies are studied. The role of religion and its influence on various Middle Eastern communities is analyzed as well. Current events will be extensively discussed.

Students will learn about different methodological approaches to the study of cultures and people. They will also learn how to conduct fieldwork in the Middle East or among groups of Middle Eastern descent and how to develop conceptual framework based on information and sources obtained from the field.

HNR 312 01 and 02: Literary Explorations of Medical Controversies
Schedule: Online (Meets 5/66/19)
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, U.S. Diversity, and SWS
Professor Sue Swartzlander, Professor of English

This junior seminar focuses on ethical, cultural, and controversial issues in medicine today. Through fiction, poetry, memoirs, film, and essays, we learn not only about peoples experiences with illness, but also how cultural differences shape our interactions with the healthcare system. Our analysis of texts elucidates attitudes toward race, ethnicity, gender, age, disability, and sexual orientation, which have been implicit in objective medical science from the Victorian period through our contemporary experience. Topics include research/experimentation, aging, womens health issues, AIDS, depression, cancer, and end-of-life concerns. Students are encouraged to use course assignments to explore their own areas of specific interest.

Fall 2013

HNR 311 01: Maria Esquit : The Story of a Guatemalan Immigrant
Schedule: MWF 11:00-11:50
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, World Perspectives, and SWS

Gordon Alderink, Associate Professor of Health Professions
Melissa Baker-Boosamra, Affiliate Professor, Liberal Studies Department

Maria Esquit is a Mayan Indian from Guatemala who illegally immigrated to the United States during that countrys civil war. Students who enroll in this junior seminar will study Guatelmalan political, historical, socio-economic, cultural, educational, linguistic, and ethical factors to aid in the understanding of Marias circumstances. Using a student-directed, collaborative learning (problem-based learning) model, students will identify and describe the intersection of multiple social issues and pose potential solutions to the obstacles Maria encountered. Community connections will make the didactic experience more concrete.

HNR 311 03: French Literature of the Eighteenth Century: Enlightenment and Revolution
Schedule: MW 6:00-7:15
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, World Perspectives, and SWS

David Eick, Associate Professor of Modern Languages and Literatures
Can books cause revolutions? Were the origins of the French Revolution intellectual in nature? Scholars have posed these questions since 1790, and although students may not definitively answer them in this course, they will bear them in mind as they encounter texts which the French Revolutions friends and foes cited as its causes. Cross-listed with FRE 412. Honors students will read texts in translation and write papers in English. Class discussion will be in English. Students will play two Reacting to the Past games: The Enlightenment in Crisis: Diderots Encyclopédie in a Parisian Salon, 1751-59; and Rousseau, Burke, and Revolution in France, 1791.

HNR 312 01: Literary Explorations of Medical Controversies
Schedule: TR 10:00 - 11:15
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, U.S. Diversity, and SWS

Jane Toot , Professor of Physical Therapy
This junior seminar focuses on ethical, cultural, and controversial issues in medicine today. Through fiction, poetry, memoirs, film, and essays, we learn not only about peoples experiences with illness, but also how cultural differences shape our interactions with the healthcare system. Our analysis of texts elucidates attitudes toward race, ethnicity, gender, age, disability, and sexual orientation, which have been implicit in objective medical science from the Victorian period through our contemporary experience. Topics include research/experimentation, aging, womens health issues, AIDS, depression, cancer, and end of life concerns. Students are encouraged to use course assignments to explore their own areas of specific interest.

HNR 312 02: Literary Explorations of Medical Controversies
Schedule: Online
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, U.S. Diversity, and SWS

Sue Swartzlander , Professor of English
This junior seminar focuses on ethical, cultural, and controversial issues in medicine today. Through fiction, poetry, memoirs, film, and essays, we learn not only about peoples experiences with illness, but also how cultural differences shape our interactions with the healthcare system. Our analysis of texts elucidates attitudes toward race, ethnicity, gender, age, disability, and sexual orientation, which have been implicit in objective medical science from the Victorian period through our contemporary experience. Topics include research/experimentation, aging, womens health issues, AIDS, depression, cancer, and end of life concerns. Students are encouraged to use course assignments to explore their own areas of specific interest.

HNR 312 03: Sociology of Consumption
Schedule: TR 1:00-2:15
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, U.S. Diversity, and SWS

Joel P. Stillerman

Consumption  the desire for, purchase, use, exchange, and disposal of products and services  is an essential feature of our everyday lives, yet we seldom examine its meaning and importance. Why do we want certain products? How are our desires shaped by advertising, marketing, and market research? How do our tastes reflect the class, gender, racial, and age groups to which we belong? In this course, students will have the opportunity to explore these questions by reading key theoretical perspectives on the nature and meaning of consumption as well as recent research on consumer culture in the U.S. Readings have a specific focus on how consumer behavior and consumer culture both reflect and help reinforce social inequalities based on class, race, gender and age. Significant themes include the role of advertising and promotion in consumption and culture, how historical legacies of racial inequality affect the patterns of consumption across ethnic/racial groups, the symbolic and ritual aspects of consumption, the ethics of consumption, the relationship between consumption and social roles/identities (gender, age, race), and the intersection of consumption/ sales practices with personal relationships. Classes combine lectures, discussions, group activities, and audiovisual materials. Assignments include research exercises on consumer behavior and reflective journals on students consumption practices.

HNR 312 06: SWS Games in the Circumpolar World

Schedule: MWF 9:00-9:50
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar

John Kilbourne, Professor of Movement Science
A historical and philosophical study of the games of indigenous Artic people, including an overview of the cultural attributes that inform the above. For more information please contact kilbourj@gvsu.edu

HNR 313 01: Virgil, Dante, Milton, Eliot

Schedule: TR 1:00-2:15
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar

Benjamin Lockerd

This course explores the epic tradition, from the ancient Roman poet Virgil's Aeneid to the medieval Italian poet Dante's Divine Comedy, then on to the Renaissance English poet Milton's Paradise Lost, and concluding with the Anglo-American poet T. S. Eliot's short epics, The Waste Land and Four Quartets. The course will be taught by Professor Levitan (Classics Department) and Professor Lockerd (English Department).

HNR 313 02: Social Impact Through Community Engagement

Schedule: MWF 9:00-9:50
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar

Bill Holsinger-Robinson

Ever wonder how events like TEDxGrandRapids ( www.tedxgrandrapids.org) come about? Where did the idea come from? How was the team pulled together and organized? How are events like this led, funded and gain community support? In this course you will learn some fundamental frameworks for starting and running your own organizations through hands on experiences working with the TEDxGrandRapids team. You will also gain exposure to other events/projects (both significant and start-up) that are happening in Grand Rapids.

Specifically, we will work to:

  • Develop your ideas
  • Create a sense of purpose and vision
  • Build and organize teams
  • Measure your impact
  • Start small through prototyping

The basics on what you can expect to learn:

  • How to build and organize teams.
  • How to run an effective meeting.
  • How to gain community support.
  • How to position yourself and your project to raise funding.
  • How to think about partnerships with other community organizations and businesses.

HNR 313 04: Petroleum GeoSystem

Schedule: TR 4:00-5:15
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and SWS

John Weber , Professor of Geology
This special topics course will explore mostly geologic, but also economic, political aspects of petroleum (hydrocarbon; oil and gas) formation, accumulation, and extraction through weekly readings (textbook and other), discussions, lectures, guest lectures, field trips, exercises, and class projects.

HNR 313 05: Theory of Human Rights

Schedule: TR 4:30-5:45
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and SWS

***This will fulfill US Diversity

Rich Hiskes

Explores the historical and philosophical development of the theory of human rights and, in the second half of the term applies theoretical approaches to significant human rights issues such as trafficking, genocide, and the rights of minority populations. Among other objectives, students will learn to appreciate different philosophical schools of thought regarding the reality of rights and their applicability to contemporary issues and construct written and oral arguments exploring the relevance and usefulness of applying human rights concepts to contemporary political, international, and ethical issues and problems.

HNR 331 01: SWS Culture and the Holocaust

Schedule: MW 4:30-5:45
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, World Perspectives, Philosophy & Literature, and SWS

Robert Franciosi, Professor of English
In Culture and the Holocaust we will consider the event from within and without  survivors responses as well as those of non-witnesses. We will first study selected European literature, art, film, and philosophy. Then, we will consider specifically American responses, from popular culture to the Holocaust museum in Washington, in order to engage the implications this event holds for our culture, what Richard Rubenstein terms the Holocaust and the American Future.

Winter 2014

HNR 311 01: Problem Solving for Sustainable Solutions through System Analysis

Schedule: TR 1:00 - 2:15
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, World Perspectives, Philosophy & Literature, and SWS

Jane Toot , Professor of Physical Therapy
This course will examine a variety of problem solving techniques which can be used across disciplines and which support a sustainable approach to seeking solutions. The range of professions will included business, education, health care, and politics. Participants will learn how to identify, use and develop isomorphic strategies and tools to address presented problems.


HNR 311 02: Biotechnology and the World


Schedule: TR 10:00-11:15
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, World Perspectives, Philosophy & Literature, and SWS

Osman Patel, Assistant Professor of Cell and Molecular Biology
Biotechnology has been practiced by human society since the beginning of civilization. However, the discovery of the structure of DNA and the function of cells has advanced biotechnology to unprecedented levels. Twenty-first century biotechnology, armed with genetic engineering and the deciphered codes of life (genomes), is affecting every facet of human existence and has brought about radical changes in technological approaches to the worlds problems of food, health, global warming, energy production and environment. The purpose of this course is to examine the evolution of biotechnology paralleled with the economic and societal dilemmas created around the world by the advances in biotechnology.

HNR 311 03: Survey of French Literature II: Scandalous Literature
Schedule: MW 6:00-7:15
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, World Perspectives, Philosophy & Literature, and SWS
David Eick, Associate Professor of Modern Languages and Literatures
Readers aghast, books publicly lacerated and burned by the executioner, authors and publishers threatened with the death penalty for sedition--many masterpieces of Old Regime French literature sparked heated controversy when they were first published. This course focuses on texts originally deemed offensive or dangerous for their experimentations with linguistic and literary conventions, exploration of new modes of feeling, questioning of religious and political orthodoxy, and representations of desire. Cross-listed with FRE 302. Honors students will read texts in translation and write papers in English. Class discussion will be in English. Three weeks will be devoted to a Reacting to the Past game, The Enlightenment in Crisis: Diderots Encyclopédie in a Parisian Salon.

HNR 311 04: Sacred Self: Disruptive Force of Monotheism
Schedule: MW 3:00-4:15
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, World Perspectives, Philosophy & Literature, and SWS

Jeremiah Cataldo
This course analyzes the ideological and material formation of monotheistic religious identities, historical and modern, and how those identities restrict forms or types of social engagement with the surrounding world. It starts with this basic hypothesis: monotheism, in its different forms, is a product of a contest for authority that begins in the material world.

HNR 311 05: Hollywood & the Holocaust
Schedule: MW 3:00-4:15
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, World Perspectives, Philosophy & Literature, and SWS

Robert Franciosi
For most Americans the Holocausts enormity only became evident in the spring of 1945, when celebratory images of Nazi Germanys defeat were accompanied by horrific footage from the liberated concentration camps. What has been termed American Holocaust consciousness was first prompted, then, and continues to be renewed, by our national passion for moving imageson the screen, the tube, or the lcd display. This course will trace Americas evolving understanding of the Holocaust by considering the way films and television programs, two pillars of our mass culture, have shaped that knowledge for millions of Americans. Organized chronologically, the seminar will examine how particular American works have reflected or prompted Holocaust awareness. Students will also set those understandings within the larger cultural dynamic of American society between 1945 and the present. Structure

This seminar will adopt a structure common to many GVSU science coursestwo hours of lecture/discussion, complemented with three hours of lab, i.e., film viewing. Class will meet on MW for fifty minutes, but also gather on Thursday nights for three hours to screen films. Because of this significant time commitment, course reading requirements will be less than in a typical junior seminar, though the writing expectations will remain at the SWS level.

Special Event

In March 2014, we will host Professor Annette Insdorf of Columbia University, the foremost scholar of Holocaust cinema. Besides hosting a screening of a classic American film, she will deliver a campus-wide lecture. She will also come to one of our class sessions.


HNR 312 01: American Pop Culture 18801945

Schedule: T 6:00-8:50
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and U.S. Diversity

Steve Tripp , Professor of History
This course explores American cultural traditions, paying particular attention to issues involving class, race, sexuality, and gender. As befitting a course on American culture, readings and class discussions will emphasize shared values and ideals as well as places of conflict and tension.


HNR 312 02: Literary Explorations of Medical Controversies

Schedule: TR 10:00 - 11:15
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, U.S. Diversity, and SWS

Jane Toot , Professor of Physical Therapy
This junior seminar focuses on ethical, cultural, and controversial issues in medicine today. Through fiction, poetry, memoirs, film, and essays, we learn not only about peoples experiences with illness, but also how cultural differences shape our interactions with the healthcare system. Our analysis of texts elucidates attitudes toward race, ethnicity, gender, age, disability, and sexual orientation, which have been implicit in objective medical science from the Victorian period through our contemporary experience. Topics include research/experimentation, aging, womens health issues, AIDS, depression, cancer, and end of life concerns. Students are encouraged to use course assignments to explore their own areas of specific interest.


HNR 312 03: Literary Explorations of Medical Controversies

Schedule: TR 8:30 - 9:45
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, U.S. Diversity, and SWS

Gordon Alderink , Associate Professor of Health Professions
This junior seminar focuses on ethical, cultural, and controversial issues in medicine today. Through fiction, poetry, memoirs, film, and essays, we learn not only about peoples experiences with illness, but also how cultural differences shape our interactions with the healthcare system. Our analysis of texts elucidates attitudes toward race, ethnicity, gender, age, disability, and sexual orientation, which have been implicit in objective medical science from the Victorian period through our contemporary experience. Topics include research/experimentation, aging, womens health issues, AIDS, depression, cancer, and end of life concerns. Students are encouraged to use course assignments to explore their own areas of specific interest.

HNR 312 04: Sex, Power, and Politics

Schedule: Th 6:00-8:50 pm

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, U.S. Diversity, and SWS

Karen Zivi, Professor of Honors College
This course is designed to help students understand the processes by which sexuality (understood broadly to include gender and sexual difference) is constituted through relations of power and comes to shape the lives of everyday citizens in both positive and negative ways. To that end, we will consider questions such as how do theories of sexuality inform social practices, laws, public policies, and ones sense of self? How do these theories, and the policies and practices they engender, perpetuate or minimize relations of subordination and domination? In other words, how do our gender norms undermine or enable human flourishing and freedom? And what, if anything, can or should be done in response?

This course brings the works of feminist, political, and social theorists together with the study of contemporary public policy controversies. Students will have the opportunity to explore competing theories of sexuality and consider questions such as Are men and women born or made, determined by their biology or the socially constructed? Is the male/female dichotomy enough to capture the complexity of human identity and sexuality? And what difference does difference make? These questions will be taken up in the context of philosophical and political debates over the role of women in and outside of the home, the norms of masculinity, reproductive freedom, pornography, and gay rights.

HNR 313 01: Lost Generation

Schedule: Online
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and SWS

Sue Swartzlander , Professor of English

"It was a place where the very air was impregnated with the energies of art."
- Thomas Wolfe

"Was it fun in Paris? Who did you see there and was the Madeleine pink at five o'clock and did the fountains fall with hollow delicacy into the framing of space in the Place de la Concorde and did the blue creep out from behind the Colonades of the Rue de Rivoli through the grill of the Tuileries and was the Louvre grayand metallic in the sun and did the trees hang brooding over the cafes and were there lights at night and the click of saucers and the auto horns that play DeBussey-I love Paris. How was it?"

-Zelda Fitzgerald

"If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris . . . then wherever you go for the rest of your life, it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast."

-Ernest Hemingway

If you were a writer, artist, or musician in the roaring 20's, Paris was *THE* place to be. Sign on for a journey back in time to a magical city that inspired such creative geniuses as James Joyce, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Andre Breton, Jean Cocteau, ee cummings, Gertrude Stein, Man Ray, Igor Stravinsky, Pablo Picasso, Sergei Eisenstein, Josephine Baker, and Isadora Duncan. We will read a variety of literary texts and "little magazines", view contemporary photographs, paintings, and films, and listen to music of the jazz age.

If you have an interest in modern literature, music, art, dance, film, photography, literary cafes, or the roaring twenties, this is the junior seminar for you. So, don't be a flat tire, be a darb and learn more about this ritzy time in this swanky city. Twenty-three skiddoo now to sign up for this whoppee that will be not only the bee's knees but the cat's meow as well!


HNR 313 02: Cosmology for Poets

Schedule: TR 11:30-12:45
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and SWS

Ed Baum , Professor of Chemistry
In every age, humans puzzled over how and why the universe was created, what is its nature, and what will become of it in time. The ancients debated philosophical issues concerning its existence. In the Middle Ages, natural philosophers occupied themselves with theological and mystical issues. Now that our powerful astronomical instruments give us an unprecedented view of the cosmos and the means with which to test our theories, cosmology has become a scientific endeavor. The evidence we have acquired of the accelerating expansion of the universe, the age of the stars, and the detailed structure of the cosmic microwave background show us how the universe developed since less than a microsecond after the Big Bang origin. Our understanding of the fate of the universe has been greatly strengthened while our understanding of the nature of the universe, even the nature of empty space, has been called into question. The philosophical debate over why the universe exists continues. This course is a survey of the fundamental scientific, philosophical, and religious issues in cosmology. It explores current understanding of the nature of the universe and the connections between past and present ideas on the subject.

HNR 313 03: Designing Ventures for Impact

Schedule: MWF 9:00-9:50
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and SWS

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Are you interested in creating an impact in your community or world? Maybe you should be a social entrepreneur. Whether you have been curious about what it takes to start a company, how to create an event with a cause or have your own idea for starting your own not-for-profit organization, this course is for you. We will learn some fundamental frameworks for starting and running your own organizations through hands on experiences. You will also gain exposure to other events/projects (both significant and start-up) that are happening in Grand Rapids, including Net Impact.