Science Courses

Summer 2013, Fall 2013, & Winter 2014

Students must complete one Honors Life Science Course (3 credits) and one Honors Physical Science Course (4 credits).
Students majoring in engineering, pre-health curricula, or the sciences may be able to substitute courses within their program for the Honors Sciences. Computer science majors are required to complete any one of the following two-course sequences:

CHM 115 and CHM 116 (physical science)
BIO 120 and BIO 121 (life science) PHY 220 and PHY 221 (physical science) PHY 230 and PHY 231 (physical science)

Students majoring in computer science must fulfill the other science requirement with an Honors science course.

For example, if a student completes CHM 115 and CHM 116 sequence; the life science requirement needs to be fulfilled through an Honors life science course (HNR 242, 245, or 247).

Life Science Courses
(one of the following) 3 credits each

HNR 245 01: Microbes in Society (Summer)
Schedule: MW 6:00-9:20 pm
Requirements Fulfilled: Life Science
Professor Rod Morgan, Professor of Biology
This course addresses the fundamental nature of microorganisms, how microorganisms make us sick and how we deal with infections, and the role of microorganisms in global warming. In the course, you will learn how microbes are classified and organized and what makes a microbe infectious or not. The course will also help you understand the many positive aspects of how humans exploit microorganisms in food production, such as yogurt, beer and cheese, medicine production, such as antibiotics, and sewage treatment. We will also discuss how microorganisms have influenced human history including how they have been used in past and current warfare. Since microbes can cause tremendous suffering or provide countless benefits, after taking the course you will appreciate how microorganisms greatly affect our everyday lives.


HNR 242 01: Plants and People (Fall)

Schedule: TR 6:00-7:15
Requirements Fulfilled: Life Science

Sheila Blackman , Associate Professor of Biology
Plants are the dominant organisms on the landscape and are often taken for granted. The ecology, structure, function, genetics, and variety of plants are studied in order to develop an appreciation of the dependence of humans upon them for food, oxygen, shelter, medicines, and pleasure.

HNR 245 01: Microbes in Society (Fall)

Schedule: MW 3:00 - 4:15
Requirements Fulfilled: Life Science

Rod Morgan , Professor of Biology

This course addresses the fundamental nature of microorganisms, how microorganisms make us sick and how we deal with infections, and the role of microorganisms in global warming. In the course, you will learn how microbes are classified and organized and what makes a microbe infectious or not. The course will also help you understand the many positive aspects of how humans exploit microorganisms in food production, such as yogurt, beer and cheese, medicine production, such as antibiotics, and sewage treatment. We will also discuss how microorganisms have influenced human history including how they have been used in past and current warfare. Since microbes can cause tremendous suffering or provide countless benefits, after taking the course you will appreciate how microorganisms greatly affect our everyday lives.

HNR 242 01: Plants and People (Winter)

Schedule: TR 4:00-5:15
Requirements Fulfilled: Life Science

Karen Amisi , Adjunct Instructor of Biology

Plants are the dominant organisms on the landscape and are often taken for granted. The ecology, structure, function, genetics, and variety of plants are studied in order to develop an appreciation of the dependence of humans upon them for food, oxygen, shelter, medicines, and pleasure.


HNR 247 01: Molecules of Life in Perspective (Winter)

Schedule: TR 1:00-2:15
Requirements Fulfilled: Life Science

Debra Burg , Associate Professor of Biomedical Sciences
This course is an introduction to basic biological concepts in the context of human health and disease. These concepts will provide the foundation for understanding the interplay between biotechnology and emerging strategies in health care. The impact of biotechnology on the social, economic, cultural, political and ethical aspects of society will be explored.


Physical Science Courses
(one of the following) 4 credits each


HNR 241 01: The Earth, a Global View (Fall and Winter)

Schedule: MWF 10:00-11:50
Requirements Fulfilled: Physical Science and Lab
Greg Wilson, Lab Coordinator

In this introduction to geology, students will engage in scientific inquiry and develop a sense of discovery of the dynamic nature of Earths systems. We will be investigating the geologic materials that comprise the Earth and the dynamic processes that are ceaselessly changing the shape of the Earth's surface. Through the integration of lecture, lab and field trips we will investigate three major geologic cycles and their related topics - plate tectonics (earthquakes, mountain building, and volcanoes), the rock cycle (minerals and rocks), and the hydrologic cycle (streams, groundwater, and glaciers). While exploring these major cycles we will examine ways in which the science of geology effects our daily lives. We will also examine how the ways in which we live can impact upon our environment.

HNR 246 10 and 901: Chemistry in Perspective (Fall and Winter)

Schedule: WF 1:00-2:50
Requirements Fulfilled: Physical Science and Lab

Edward Baum, Professor of Chemistry
This is a one-semester course in chemistry for non-science majors in the Honors program. Concepts in science are taught in the context of major societal issues such as global warming, stratospheric ozone depletion, and energy resources for the future. A guided-inquiry course, students learn the subject matter and develop essential skills by working in self-managed teams on activities that involve guided discovery, information processing, critical thinking, and problem solving, and that includes reflection on learning and assessment of performance.


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HNR 243 10 and 101: The Human Body in Motion I (Fall)


Schedule: TR 1:00-3:45
Requirements Fulfilled: Physical Science and Lab

Brad Ambrose, Associate Professor of Physics
Gordon Alderink, Associate Professor of Health Professions
This course is the first semester in the two-semester sequence fulfilling the General Education requirements in science for Honors students. The structure and function of human movement as well as the nature of science will be examined from biological, chemical, and physical perspectives in order to develop an appreciation for the human body.

HNR 244 01: The Human Body in Motion II (Winter)

Schedule: TR 2:30-3:45
Requirements Fulfilled: Life Science

James Scott , Associate Professor of Movement Science

In this second course of a two-course sequence, students continue their study of human performance from biological, chemical, and physical perspectives. Specifically, the students themselves design, develop, and execute independent projects that extend beyond the background material covered in the first course of the sequence. To fulfill part of the course requirements, students complete an academic manuscript and a scholarly oral presentation.