Diet and Exercise

Eating Healthy

What you eat and drink will affect your health. While we wholeheartedly want to encourage you to enjoy the local cuisine, use a bit of caution. Remember that your body needs time to adjust to a new location. Locals may be immune to various bacteria that could make you ill, just as visitors to the U.S. may have difficulty with some of the food and drink available here.

It is important to enjoy the local cuisine while you are abroad, however there are some helpful tips from the Center for Disease Control that will help you stay healthy.

  • Be leery of food offered by street vendors.

  • Drink only bottled water, carbonated drinks or other beverages in sealed/serrated containers.

  • Water should be boiled for 10 minutes, if you can not boil water you should consider treating it with iodine or chlorine tablets.

  • Carefully wash all raw fruits and vegetables.

  • Avoid raw or undercooked foods.

  • Do not drink beverages with ice since ice cubes may be contaminated.

  • Do not eat dairy products unless it is certain that it has been pasteurized.

  • Avoid handling animals.

  • Do not swim in fresh water.

  • Remember: boil it, cook it, peel it or forget it!

  • Drink plenty of water to maintain hydration.

  • Be careful with consuming fruit juices as they may contain untreated water.

  • Dine in restaurants that are frequented by the locals and that have high traffic. The busier the restaurant, the higher the likelihood that food will be prepared fresh instead of sitting around for several hours.

 

Stay Active
Staying active is important to maintaining your health. Exercise can provide a release from culture shock and the added stress of adjusting to a new environment. Consider planning some sort of exercise into your daily routine. For most students, this will be easy to do. Students often return from abroad indicating that they walked a lot more when they were overseas then they do when they are here in the U.S.

 

Use Your Resources

For more information on how to stay healthy, visit the CDC website. You will also find helpful information through the World Health Organization (WHO).

 

Food and Drink Tips

  • What you eat and drink will affect your health. Locals may be immune to various bacteria that could make you ill, just as visitors to the U.S. may have difficulty with some of the food and drink available here. Please follow with the lead of your Faculty Director.
  • Dine in restaurants that are frequented by the locals and have high traffic. The busier the restaurant, the higher the likelihood that food will be prepared using fresh ingredients.

  • Be leery of food offered by street vendors.

  • Drink plenty of water to maintain hydration.

  • Ask you Faculty Director whether the tap water is potable. If it is not, drink bottled water, carbonated drinks or other beverages in sealed containers, or boiled water. Water should be boiled for 10 minutes. If you cannot boil tap water, you should consider treating it with iodine or chlorine tablets. Do not drink beverages with ice, since ice cubes may be contaminated. When brushing your teeth, do not rinse your mouth with untreated water.

  • Carefully wash all raw fruits and vegetables in potable water.

  • Be careful with consuming fruit juices as they may contain untreated water.

  • Avoid raw or undercooked foods.

  • Do not eat dairy products unless it is certain that they have been pasteurized.

  • Avoid handling animals

  • Remember: boil it, cook it, peel it or forget it!

  • For more information:

http://travel.state.gov/medical.html

http://www.lonelyplanet.com

http://www.tripprep.com

http://drwisetravel.com/index.html


http:/ / www.cdc.gov

 

 

Page last modified August 30, 2012