Anthropology Department

Courses and Curriculum

Courses/Curriculum
 

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Six weeks in New Zealand "Eco-Villages" (ANT 340 & 308)
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Checklist of Anthropology Major Requirements
Course Checklist for students with a Catalog year before Fall 2011 

Course Checklist for students who began at GVSU Fall 2011 or later
Anthropology Minor Checklist

Opportunities for Anthropology Students (pdf)
Frequently Asked Questions (pdf)

Departmental Minor in Archaeology

 

GVSU On-Line Anthropology Course Listings


ANT 204 - Intro to Cultural Anthropology (Gen Ed, Social and Behavioral Sciences; World Perspectives)
ANT 206 - Human Origins (Gen Ed, Life Sciences Foundation)
ANT 207 - Language and Culture
ANT 210 - History of Theory
ANT 215 - Origins of Civilization (Gen Ed, Historical Perspectives Foundation; World Perspectives)
ANT 220 - Introduction to Archaeology (Gen Ed, Social and Behavioral Sciences)
ANT 300 - Research Methods in Anthropology
ANT 307 - Field Techniques and Laboratory Methods in Anthropology
ANT 311 - Native Peoples of North America (Gen Ed, T20; U.S. Diversity)
ANT 312 - Human Osteology
ANT 313 - Primate Behavior and Ecology
ANT 314 - Bioarchaeology
ANT 315 - Comparative Religions (Gen Ed, T9; World Perspectives)
ANT 316 - Death, Burial, and Culture (Gen Ed, T14; World Perspectives)
ANT 317 - Advances Anthropological Linguistics
ANT 320 - Culture and Disease (Gen Ed, T16)
ANT 325 - Archaeology of North America
ANT 330 - Ethnology of Selected World Areas
ANT 340 - Culture and Environment (Gen Ed, T11; World Perspectives)
ANT 345 - Perspectives on Globalization (Gen Ed, T15, World Perspectives)
ANT 346 - Kinship and Culture (Gen Ed, World Perspectives)
ANT 347 - Environments and Cultures of the Great Lakes Region
ANT 350 - Archaeology of Mid-East
ANT 355 - Migration in Americas (Gen Ed, T7)
ANT 360 - Ethnology of Mesoamerica (Gen Ed, T7; World Perspectives)
ANT 370 - Cross-cultural Perspectives on Gender (Gen Ed, T8; World Perspectives)
ANT 380 - Special Topics in Anthropology
ANT 399 - Independent Readings
ANT 405 - Anthropological Theory
ANT 490 - Practicum: Career-Service
ANT 495 - Practicing Anthropology (capstone)
ANT 498 - Honors Research in Anthropology
ANT 499 - Independent Study and Research       

 

Anthropology (ANT) Course Descriptions:

ANT 204 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology


Introduces the discipline of anthropology by examining the diversity of human cultures that have been described by anthropologists over the last 100 years. The principles of anthropology are explained with examples drawn from non-Western culture. Comparisons are drawn with our own. Fulfills one of the Foundation - Social and Behavioral Sciences. Fulfills Cultures - World Perspectives. Offered fall and winter semesters.
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ANT 206 - Human Origins

Examines the dynamic interplay between human biology and culture through the study of human evolution. Grounded in the mechanisms of evolution, the class examines the emergence of our species and our relationship to nonhuman primates, among other topics. Fulfills Foundation -Life Sciences. Offered fall and winter semesters.
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ANT 207 - Language and Culture

Explores the interaction between language, communication, and culture, employing cross-cultural analysis to reveal cultural models and to understand how linguistic variation is linked to gender, age, region, ethnicity, and class. Several practical activities are used to apply analyses to anthropological problems. Offered winter semester of odd-numbered years.
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ANT 210 - History of Anthropological Theory

Considers the major historical development and theoretical trends in anthropology since 1860. The approach is both topical and historical. Connections with developments in related disciplines are noted. Offered fall semester. Prerequisite: ANT 204 or ANT 206.
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ANT 215 - Origins of Civilization

This course examines the consequences of decisions made by our ancestors, the successes and failures of past civilizations, so that we may better understand our own behavior. Development of world civilizations is explored using historic, archaeological and other perspectives that inform us about the past. Fulfills Foundation - Historical Perspectives. Fulfills Cultures - World Perspectives. Offered winter semester.
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ANT 220 - Introduction to Archaeology

Introduction to the methods and techniques of archaeology, including the methods of excavation, analysis, dating techniques, and data presentation. Course has fieldwork opportunities and draws on examples from local and worldwide research. Fulfills one of the Foundation - Social and Behavioral Sciences. Offered fall and winter semesters.
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ANT 300 - Research Methods in Anthropology

An emphasis on anthropology as a way of knowing demonstrated through an understanding of the relationships between theory, formulating and testing hypotheses, research design, sampling, data collection and ethics. Anthropological research methods are introduced through a series of projects including a research proposal. Offered fall semester. Prerequisites: STA 215; 9 credits in anthropology.
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ANT 307 - Field Techniques and Laboratory Methods in Anthropology

Training in the application of research methods under field conditions to problems in major areas of anthropology; supervised instruction in anthropological laboratory techniques, including data collection and storage, analysis, and interpretation. Offered spring/summer semester. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
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ANT 308 - Field Experience Abroad

Of varying focus, the course makes use of the history, culture, and society of a host country in order to highlight disciplinary perspectives in context. To be taught in that country (or countries) as part of an approved study abroad program. By permit only. Credit may vary.
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ANT 311 - Native Peoples of North America

A multifaceted examination of North American Indians and a comparison of that culture with the American. Focus on origin, early history, and present disposition of American Indian populations. Fulfills Cultures - U.S. Diversity. Fulfills one of the Issues/Themes requirements. Offered fall and winter semesters.
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ANT 312 - Human Osteology

The course explores skeletal biology, growth and development, identification, and assessment of pathological and traumatic conditions. The course focuses on standard forms of data acquisition in traditional physical anthropology and for forensic anthropological applications; including bone identification, aging, sexing, stature, siding, biological affinity, pathology, taphonomy, trauma, and collection of metrics. Offered winter semester. Prerequisite: ANT 206.
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ANT 313 - Primate Behavior and Ecology

This course is an overview of the behavior of nonhuman primates within an ecological framework. Topics include a survey of living primates, constraints of body size on locomotion and diet, conservation, communication, conflict resolution, and the role of the environment in diet, on reproductive strategies and in social interaction. Offered fall semester of odd numbered years.
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ANT 314 - Bioarchaeology

Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from archaeological settings. Its study encompasses the ethical treatment of human remains, reconstruction of patterns of subsistence, disease, activity, status, ethnicity, diet and demography from the human skeleton to better understand the way that people chose to live in the past. Offered fall semester of even-numbered years. Prerequisite: ANT 206.
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ANT 315 - Comparative Religions

A cross-cultural study of contemporary religions. Examines the diversity of religious meanings through the lived experiences of cultures, traditions, and sects around the world. Exposes students to anthropological interpretations of religion through a range of methods, including ethnography. Themes include symbolisms, ritual, death, shamanism, healing, magic, pilgrimage and interfaith movements. Fulfills Cultures - World Perspectives. Part of the Identity Issue. Offered fall and winter semesters. Prerequisite: Junior standing.
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ANT 316 - Death, Burial, and Culture


This course examines how different cultures approach issues and customs surrounding death. Drawing on evidence from biological and cultural anthropology and archaeology, students learn from the dead by exploring the experience of death and how it illuminates life in different cultures around the world and through time. Offered fall semester. Fulfills one of the Issues/Themes requirements. Fulfills Cultures - World Perspectives. Prerequisite: ANT 204, ANT 206, ANT 220, or permission of instructor.
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ANT 317 - Advanced Cross-Cultural Linguistics


Survey and comparison of global linguistic diversity focusing on ways different cultures and languages represent, organize and express through, knowledge and emotion in life, political relations, rituals, and personal experience. Survey includes case studies from around the world with emphasis on languages and dialects other than Standard English. Offered winter semester of even-numbered years. Prerequisite: ANT 207.
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ANT 320 - Culture and Disease

Introduces students to the anthropological study of disease ecology and medical systems cross-culturally. Explores the impact of disease, ecology, and sociocultural behavior throughout human evolution. Investigates the efficacy and nature of nonwestern curing procedures and the cultural and psychodynamic features of illness. Fulfills one of the Issues/Themes requirements. Offered fall semester. Prerequisite: ANT 204 or ANT 206 or ANT 220.
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ANT 325 - Archaeology of North America

A survey of prehistoric developments from Alaska to Central America, including the Mesoamerican civilizations. Offered winter semester of even-numbered years. Prerequisite: ANT 220.
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ANT 330 - Ethnology of Selected World Areas

Offered on demand, with each offering devoted to the study of a particular area. Students may repeat the course provided each repeat is for a different area. Offered on sufficient demand.
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ANT 340 - Culture and Environment

Compares different adaptive strategies of cultures from around the world and seeks understanding of ethical and social values different groups have related to the environment. Attention is focused on how humans relied on cultural mechanisms in the past to adapt and change their physical and natural environment. Fulfills Cultures - World Perspectives. Part of the Sustainability Issue. Offered each semester. Prerequisites: Junior Standing, WRT 150, and either Historical Perspectives or US Diversity.
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ANT 345 - Perspectives on Globalization

The anthropology of globalization examines the emergence of “globalized local cultures.” Students employ the ethnographic approach to understand globalization as the intensification of interconnectedness, in which anthropologists learn that fundamental problems of deep and universal concern to humans everywhere will need to be addressed at local, national, and global levels. Offered fall semester, even years. Fulfills Cultures - World Perspectives. Part of the Globalization Issue. Prerequisite: Junior standing.
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ANT 346 - Kinship and Culture

A survey and practical application of anthropological kinship. The course critically evaluates kinship concepts and case studies in order to understand how group identity links to culture, biology, reproduction, gender, and family. A cross-cultural perspective is emphasized. Offered winter semester of even-numbered years. Fulfills Cultures - World Perspectives. Prerequisite: ANT 204.
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ANT 347 - Environments and Cultures of the Great Lakes Region

Pleistocene history, landforms, soils, vegetation and wildlife, and cultural development in the Great Lakes region over the past 20,000 years. 
Offered on sufficient demand. Prerequisite: Junior or senior status in anthropology, biology, geology, resource management, or sociology.
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ANT 350 - Archaeology of Mid-East

The Middle East is recognized as the birthplace of several major cultural traditions. This course examines the evidence of archaeology that informs us on the origins and settlement of the Middle East from at least one million years ago to the seventh century A.D. from the perspective of cultural ecology. 
Offered winter semester of odd-numbered years. Prerequisite: ANT 215 or ANT 220 or MES 201 or prior approval of the instructor.
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ANT 355 - Migration in Americas


A comparative, cross-cultural study of human migration in the Americas, drawing on the discipline of anthropology for methodology and content. Explores patterns of migration and issues of adaptation, assimilation, borders, transnationalism, immigrants, refugees, displacees, identity, and ethnicity. Part of the Continuity and Change in the Americas Theme. Offered fall semester of odd-numbered years.
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ANT 360 - Ethnology of Mesoamerica


Examines the cultural history and social dynamics that have shaped modern Mesoamerica. Includes discussion of environment, archaeology, diversity of modern Mexican and Guatemalan cultures and current issues of development and human rights. Fulfills Cultures - World Perspectives. Fulfills one of the Issues/Themes requirements. Offered fall of even-numbered years.
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ANT 370 - Cross-cultural Perspectives on Gender


Examines gender as a fundamental organizing theme of culture. Also emphasizes the sociocultural basis for gender differences using a cross-cultural and comparative approach. Discusses how gender relations affect all other aspects of human life. Fulfills one of the Issues/Themes requirements. Offered winter semester. Prerequisite: ANT 204 or ANT 206.
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ANT 380 - Special Topics in Anthropology


A series of courses providign an in-depth study of a problem in anthropologyand the methods of investigating it. Various topics of cross-cultural interest, such as human evolution, peasant cultures, preliterate societies, kinship pattern, and culture and personality will be examines. Three credits. Offered on demand.
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ANT 399 - Independent Readings


Independent supervised readings in selected topics. A student may take only one reading course for one to three credits per term. No more than six hours of 399 and 499 combined may count toward a major or three hours of 399 and 499 combined toward a minor. Prerequisites: 204 or 206 and the written consent of the instructor before registration. Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Offered fall and winter semesters.
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ANT 405 - Contemporary Anthropological Theory

This course surveys contemporary topics in anthropological theory. Included are an overview of current issues, topics and debates in archaeology, physical/biological, socio-cultural, and linguistic anthropology. Students will gain an understanding of recent trends in anthropology and the trajectory of the discipline. Connections with developments in related disciplines are noted. Offered fall semester. Prerequisites: ANT 210 and senior standing in anthropology.
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ANT 490 - Practicum: Career-Service


Agency experience in the community relating practical training and independent study in a specialized area. Limited to 10 credits maximum. Offered every semester. Prerequisites: 15 hours of course preparation and permission of instructor. Graded credit/no credit.
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ANT 495 - Practicing Anthropology (Capstone)


Provides students with a broad and comprehensive perspective on the fundamental assumptions and issues in anthropology. Emphasis on the application of anthropological knowledge to solve social problems. Given the diverse dimensions of current trends in anthropology, students will work to establish their particular interests with the field. Offered winter semester.  Prerequisites: Senior standing in anthropology and ANT 405.
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ANT 498 - Honors Research in Anthropology


Original research conducted individually with faculty supervision, based on a formal proposal. Project is the culmination of undergraduate research incorporating anthropological theory, methodology, data collection, and analysis. Research will be presented in a public forum. Syllabus and guidelines for honors research available from faculty. Offered every semester. Prerequisites: ANT 300, acceptance of formal written proposal and permission of faculty member.
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ANT 499 - Independent Study and Research


Research conducted individually with faculty supervision. Attention given to written and oral presentation of research findings. A student may take only one independent study per term. No more than six hours of 399/499 may count toward a major or three hours of 399/499 toward the minor. Offered every semester. Prerequisites: Nine hours in the department and written permission of instructor before registration. 
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Page last modified September 16, 2014